Terrorism

The International Law of Drones

Introduction

When humans first launched themselves into the air to attack their enemies, they used balloons. Later came planes and helicopters. The latest development in the area of airborne attacks takes the human operator out of the air. People may operate unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs or drones) thousands of miles from the drone’s location.[1]

Topic: 
Volume: 
14
Issue: 
37
Author: 
Mary Ellen O’Connell
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The United States Before the UN Human Rights Council

Introduction

Topic: 
Volume: 
14
Issue: 
33
Author: 
Christina M. Cerna and David P. Stewart
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Australian Court Permits Damages Claim for Torture by former Guantánamo Bay Detainee to Proceed

I. Introduction

Topic: 
Volume: 
14
Issue: 
28
Author: 
Dr. Stephen Tully
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The Writ Stops Here: No Habeas for Prisoners Held by U.S. Forces in Afghanistan

Introduction

Topic: 
Volume: 
14
Issue: 
13
Author: 
Faiza Patel
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The European Court of Justice Kadi Decision and the Future of UN Counterterrorism Sanctions

Introduction

The UN Security Council’s use of “targeted sanctions” against suspected terrorists – an important counter-terrorism tool designed to immobilize assets and limit travel – has come under increasing challenge by regional and national courts.[1] The challenge is simple: the sanctioning of a person amounts to the imposition of a penalty, yet the normal due process afforded alleged criminals does not apply.

Topic: 
Volume: 
13
Issue: 
20
Author: 
Peter Fromuth
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Who can be detained in the "War on Terror"? The Emerging Answer

Introduction

Topic: 
Volume: 
13
Issue: 
18
Author: 
Faiza Patel
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Special Tribunal for Lebanon: The First Orders by the Pre-Trial Judge

I. Introduction

Topic: 
Volume: 
13
Issue: 
11
Author: 
Antonios Tzanakopoulos
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The Torture Memos and Accountability

Introduction

Topic: 
Volume: 
13
Issue: 
6
Author: 
Allen S. Weiner
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Supreme Court Holds that Noncitizens Detained at Guantanamo Have a Constitutional Right to Habeas Corpus Review by Federal Civilian Courts

On June 12, 2008, the Supreme Court ruled against the U.S. government in cases brought by foreign nationals challenging their detention at the Guantanamo Bay, Cuba military facility.[1] A five-justice majority in Boumediene v. Bush held that the Military Commissions Act of 2006 (MCA)[2] violated the U.S.

Topic: 
Volume: 
12
Issue: 
13
Author: 
Andrew Kent
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Saadi v Italy: European Court of Human Rights Reasserts the Absolute Prohibition on Refoulement in Terrorism Extradition Cases

On February 28, 2008, the Grand Chamber of the European Court of Human Rights (ECtHR) handed down its judgment in Saadi v Italy.[1] In this case, Italy and the United Kingdom (as third party intervener) claimed that the climate of international terrorism called into question the appropriateness of the ECtHR's existing jurisprudence on states' non-refoulement obligation under Article 3 of the European Convention on Human Rights (European Conve

Topic: 
Volume: 
12
Issue: 
9
Author: 
Fiona de Londras
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Organizations of Note: