2022 Midyear Meeting


The ASIL Midyear Meeting

The American Society of International Law hosts a Midyear Meeting annually in late October or early November. The meeting encompasses several events, including leadership meetings of the Society's Executive Council and the Board of Editors of the American Journal of International Law; the Research Forum, which features cutting-edge international law scholarship by more than 70 authors; and programming for practitioners. The Midyear Meeting has been held since 2010 in Miami, Los Angeles, Athens & Atlanta, New York, Chicago, Washington, DC, Seattle, St. Louis, New York, and virtually. This year's meeting will be held in Miami, November 10-12, 2022.


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Registration is now open for the 2022 Midyear Meeting of the American Society of International Law, to be held on Thursday to Saturday, November 10-12, at ASIL Law Firm Partner Bryan Cave Leighton Paisner LLP (Thursday, November 10) and ASIL Academic Partner University of Miami School of Law (Friday & Saturday, November 11-12). Registration includes access to both the Practitioners’ Forum (on Thursday) and the Research Forum (on Friday and Saturday), as well as all breaks, lunches, and receptions noted in the agenda below. A registration option to attend only the Practitioners’ Forum is now available.

Registration must be completed in advance. No “walk-ins” will be permitted.

2022 ASIL Midyear Meeting Agenda (DRAFT)


Thursday, November 10, 2022

Practitioners' Forum
(All events on Thursday held at Bryan Cave Leighton Paisner LLP, 200 S Biscayne Blvd #400 Miami, FL 33131)

1:45 pm
Practitioners’ Forum check-in opens

2:15 – 3:15 pm
Ask Us Anything: Careers in international law

3:15 – 3:30 pm
Break

3:30 – 4:30 pm
The International Law Commission and the Problem of “Regional” Jus Cogens

4:30 – 4:45 pm
Break

4:45 – 5:45 pm
Crossing the Finish Line: UNCITRAL’s Re-imagining of Investor-State Dispute Settlement

5:45 – 6:30 pm
Keynote Address

6:30 – 7:30 pm
Reception, Sponsored by Bryan Cave LLP

Friday, November 11, 2022

Research Forum
(All events on Friday and Saturday held at the University of Miami School of Law, 1311 Miller Rd, Coral Gables, FL 33146)

8:30 am                        
Research Forum check-in opens

8:30 – 12:30 pm      
ASIL Executive Council meeting (by invitation)

9:00 – 10:30 am     
Parallel sessions:
• Training Session: Pursuing a Career in International Law
• Rebalancing Economic Agreements Towards a Development Perspective, Sponsored by the Latin American Network for International Economic Law

11:00 – 12:30 pm      
Parallel sessions:
• Training Session: Publishing in International Law Workshop
• Invisible Atrocities: How does international law look at violence? (book discussion)

12:30 – 1:30 pm
Lunch

1:30 – 3:00 pm
Research Forum Session I

3:00 – 3:15 pm
Break

3:15 – 4:45 pm
Research Forum Session II

4:45 – 5:00 pm
Break

5:00 – 5:45 pm
Keynote Address

5:45 – 7:00 pm
Welcome Reception, Sponsored by University of Miami School of Law

Saturday, November 12, 2022

8:30 – 11:30 am
AJIL Board meeting (by invitation)

9:30 – 11:00 am
Research Forum Session III

11:00 – 11:15 am
Break

11:15 – 12:45 pm      
Research Forum Session IV

12:45 – 1:45 pm
Lunch & Resource Fair

1:45 – 3:15 pm
Research Forum Session V

3:15 – 3:30 pm
Break

3:30 – 5:00 pm
Research Forum Session VI


5:30 – 6:30 pm
Closing Reception (off-site), Sponsored by Midyear Meeting Law Firm Partners

 (Papers listed alphabetically by author)

  • “Public Attitudes Toward Extraterritorial Law Enforcement: The case of anti-foreign bribery law,” Elizabeth Acorn, University of Toronto &       Michael Allen, Yale University
  • “Sidestepping Colonial Continuities on African Copyright Landscape Through Antitrust Principles,” 'Damola Adediji, University of Ottawa
  • “Debtor's War: Law and political economy in the war on terror,” Zohra Ahmed, University of Georgia School of Law
  • “COVID-19 and Balance of Payments Crisis in Developing Countries: Balancing trade, sovereign debt, and development in Africa,” Eurallyah Akinyi, Schulich School of Law, Dalhousie University
  • “Multilaterally Updating Bilateralism: Learning from other regimes to efficiently reform international economic law,” Wolfgang Alschner, University of Ottawa & Bin Cheng, University of Ottawa
  • “Making Trade Agreements Work for Gender Equality: The widening negotiation capacity gap?” Renata Amaral, Georgetown University Law Center & Amrita Bahri, Instituto Tecnológico Autónomo de México
  • “The Scope of the Recognition Power,” Scott Anderson, The Brookings Institution
  • “It’s Time to Rethink the Law of Armed Conflict,” Joshua Andresen, University of Surrey School of Law
  • “The Distribution of Rights and Responsibilities under International Climate Change Law: An examination of the equity approach,” Elkanah Babatunde, Irish Rule of Law International
  • “Embracing the Past: A way forward for diverse international judicial bodies?” Ashley Barnes, University of Toronto Faculty of Law
  • “In the Eye of the Beholder? Stealth inconsistency in the practice of international judicial fora,” Barbara Bazanth, NYU School of Law
  • “Preparing and Responding to Future Pandemics through a Regional Framework for Health Governance in the IAHRS,” Carlos Bernal, University of Dayton School of Law & Uchechukwu Ngwaba, Lincoln Alexander School of Law, Toronto Metropolitan University
  • “Understanding UN Documents: Quantitative text analysis and its potential for studying normative change at the United Nations,” Hannah Birkenkoetter, Instituto Tecnológico Autónomo de México (ITAM)
  • “Environmental Rights as ‘Biocultural’ Rights in International Law: A bridge between human rights and humanity’s stewards,” Giusto Amedeo Boccheni, McGill University & Kaito Suzuki, McGill University
  • “Enabling ESG Accountability: Focusing on the Global Corporate Enterprise,” Rachel Brewster, Duke University School of Law
  • “Human Rights Implications of Digital Trade Law,” Mira Burri, University of Lucerne
  • “International Economic Law's Governance Trauma,” Sungjoon Cho, Chicago-Kent College of Law
  • “Who Owns Trade Policy? Voice and law in the separation of trade law powers,” Kathleen Claussen, University of Miami School of Law & Wendy Li, University of Wisconsin Department of Sociology
  • “The Forensic Child: Reconciling international law and methodological confusion in child trafficking research and programs,” Brendan Conner, St. Thomas University College of Law
  • “State Responsibility for Forced Migration,” Pooja Dadhania, California Western School of Law
  • “Back to Basics: The benefits of paradigmatic international organizations,” Kristina Daugirdas, University of Michigan Law School & Katerina Linos, UC Berkeley Law
  • “Policy Paper on Gender Persecution,” Lisa Davis, CUNY Law School
  • “Digital Plurilateralism,” Georgios Dimitropoulos, Hamid Ben Khalil University College of Law
  • “Climate Justice for Women: Gender-mainstreaming following the Lima Programme,” Freya Doughty, Washington University in St. Louis School of Law
  • “Stories from the Letters of Withdrawal from International Treaties,” Sanja Dragić, Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies
  • “The Pledging World Order,” Melissa (MJ) Durkee, University of Georgia School of Law
  • “The War in Ukraine and the Legitimacy of the International Criminal Court,” Yvonne Dutton, Indiana University McKinney School of Law & Milena Sterio, Cleveland-Marshall College of Law
  • “Private Elites and International Organizations: Internal regulations of public-private partnerships at the United Nations,” Julia Emtseva, Max Planck Institute for Comparative Public Law & International Law
  • “Market Mechanisms for Decarbonization: Tensions and implications for natural gas markets,” Alexander Ezenagu, Hamid Ben Khalifa University & Walters Nsoh, Birmingham Law School
  • “The Malabo Protocol and Victim Participation in International Criminal Justice: Lessons for Africa, lessons from Africa,” Andrew Feinstein, Georgetown University Law Center & Clea Strydom, Centre for International Law and Policy in Africa
  • “From Policy Back to Principles? Refugee protection under international law & state (non)-compliance,” Hannah Garry, University of Southern California Gould School of Law
  • “Disregarding Slavery and the Slave Trade,” Jocelyn Getgen Kestenbaum, Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law
  • “From Guns to Scalpels: Reproductive violence and the gendered future of genocide,” Anthony Ghaly, UC Berkeley School of Law
  • “Empirical Consequences of Normative Flaws: The gap between the principle of temporary refuge and a refugee status,” Maciej Grześkowiak, University of Warsaw
  • “Internet Shutdowns and Human Rights: Looking beyond the territorial,” Bharath Gururagavendran  Jindal Global Law School & Kiran Suryanarayana, UCLA School of Law
  • “Lethal Force as Transitional Justice,” Zachary Kaufman, University of Houston Law Center
  • “Intangible Heritage and Persecution Based on Race and Gender in Colombia,” JM Kirby, MADRE & René Urueña, Universidad de los Andes
  • “Judicial Foreign Policy,” Chimène Keitner, UC Hastings Law
  • “COMESA Competition Commission Agenda Setting Power in COMESA and COMESA Member State’s Competition Policy Legislative Processes,” Vellah Kedogo Kigwiru, Hochshule für Politik, Technical University of Munich
  • “Third World Approaches to International law (TWAIL): A cognitive turn,” Shiri Krebs, Deakin University Law School
  • “The Rise and Fall of the Market Metaphor of International Trade Lawmaking,” Nicolas Lamp, Queen's University
  • “Social Sanctions,” Desiree LeClercq, Cornell University
  • “Reparations for Coercive Sterilization of Roma Women in Europe as a Framework for Latina Women in the United States,” Simone Levine, Human Rights Center, UC Berkeley School of Law & Rebecca Mitchell, Vermont Supreme Court
  • “Is the Natural Environment a Subject of International Humanitarian Law?” Andrea Lloreda, Georgetown University Law Center
  • “The Normative Logic of Complementarity,” Ryan Liss, University of Western Ontario Faculty of Law
  • “Conceptualising State-International Tribunal Interaction: The ICC and “African Backlash” in Context,” Henry Lovat, University of Glasgow & Shaina Western, Cabinet Office, Government of the United Kingdom
  • “State Responsibility for Negligent Intelligence,” Asaf Lubin, Indiana University Maurer School of Law
  • “The Right to Truth and In Absentia Trials: A case study of the Napalpí Massacre Truth Trial in Argentina,” Irene Victoria Massimino, Robert H. McKinney School of Law, Indiana University
  • “Extraterritorial Corporate Governance,” William Moon, University of Maryland School of Law
  • “Goods' Citizenship,” Trang (Mae) Nguyen, Temple University Beasley School of Law
  • “Comparative Study of Central Bank Digital Currencies from a Legal and Economic Perspective,” Vasu Nigam, Stanford Law School
  • “Making Sense of the Application of International Law to Armed Non-State Actors: Introducing the state ratification theory,” Joshua Joseph Niyo, UCLA School of Law
  • “The Belt and Road Initiative and Sustainable Development in Central Asia: The myths and realities of environmental stewardship,” Roza Nurgozhayeva, Nazarbayev University
  • “‘Off with their heads!’ Critiquing the Energy Charter Treaty’s dispute settlement mechanism amid carbon-based energy phase out,” Tanya Oberoi, McGill University
  • “The Exceptions Transplant: The comparative law and political economy of trade and investment law,” Stratos Pahis, Wake Forest University School of Law
  • “SOEs As a Tool for Developing A New Regulatory Framework for Renewable Energy: What constraints under WTO law?” Anna Panarella, University of Turin Department of Law
  • “Reconceptualizing Legitimate Expectations for Sustainable Development,” Hui Pang, University of New South Wales School of Law
  • “Ad Intelligendum Et Ad Agendum: Understanding and operation of international tribunals’ (substantive) incidental jurisdiction,” Alina Papanastasiou, Three Crowns LLP
  • “International organizations and the ‘emerging right to democratic governance:’ What role for state sovereignty?” Nikolaos Pavlopoulos, International Court of Justice
  • “Demographic Engineering and the International Legal Order: Creation, dissolution and mutations in the state and the people,” Andrea Maria Pelliconi, City Law School, University of London
  • “Fragmentation or Cross-Cultural Consensus: Transnational judicial dialogue as a Habermasian ideal type discursive space,” Ayodeji Perrin, Temple University Department of Political Science
  • “Climate Change Mitigation and the Transformation of International Trade La,” Heloisa Pereira, National University of Singapore
  • “The Legacy of the Trump Administration in International Law ,” Mark Pollack, Temple University
  • “Disability Rights and International Armed Conflict: An oversight,” Shuchi Purohit, Tufts University, The Fletcher School
  • “Remedying Wrong Incidental Determinations in International Adjudication,” Relja Radović, BDK Advokati AOD
  • “Weaponizing State Inaction: Theorizing the Covid care crisis in international law,” Shruti Rana, Indiana University Bloomington
  • “Corporate Influence and Investor-State Dispute Settlement,” Weijia Rao, George Mason University Antonin Scalia Law School
  • “Complementary Protection for Venezuelans in Colombia: A comparative analysis of ‘temporary’ protection,” Angela Remus, Boston University School of Law
  • “Effects of COVID-19 on the Treaty Interpretation: State's conduct in terms of subsequent agreement and subsequent practice,” Rakesh Roshan, Supreme Court of India
  • “Explaining Divergent Treaty Implementation: The case of the Indigenous and Tribal Peoples Convention,” Pablo Rueda-Saiz, University of Miami School of Law
  • “Transnational Labour Mobility and the Global Compact for Safe, Orderly and Regular Migration; A TWAIL analysis,” Christiana Sagay, Vulner Research Project, University of Ottawa
  • “Applying the Law of Armed Conflict in Domestic Courts: The fusion of domestic and international law and the question of IHL expertise,” Yahli Shereshevsky, University of Haifa
  • “Bringing Courts into a Climate-Disrupted World: Toward a theory of the role of climate litigation in global governance,” Karen Sokol, Loyola University New Orleans College of Law
  • “The Global Diffusion of Anti-Terrorism Law and Its Impact on Human Rights,” Jessica Stanton, Temple University
  • “Cascading Consequences of Sinking States: Revisiting sovereignty and responsibility in the face of sea-level rise,” Melissa Stewart, Georgetown University Law Center
  • “Article 103 of the United Nations Charter: Uncharted Possibilities?” Eran Sthoeger, Eran Sthoeger, Esq.
  • “Investment Protection Standards as Subsidiary Principles of Governmental Accountability: Lessons from the American legal history,” Michal Swarabowicz, University of Amsterdam
  • “State Defense and the Effective international Adjudication of the Inter-American Human Rights Court,” Piero Vásquez, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico
  • “Theorizing Enforcement Unilateralism,” Pierre-Hugues Verdier, University of Virginia School of Law
  • “Treaty Design and Distributive Politics: Negotiating the prohibitions against child labor in international law,” Andrea Vilán, Princeton School of Public and International Affairs, Princeton University
  • “Coordination, Commitment, and Enforcement: An institutional account of the U.S.-China economic relationship,” Mengyi Wang, Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies, Geneva
  • “China’s Engagement in the International Commercial Dispute Resolution Mechanism and its Influence on Legal Globalisation,” Yizhi Wang, Queen Mary, University of London
  • “The Color of Revolution: Foreign elections, mass resistance, and the prohibition against nonforcible intervention,” Elizabeth Wilson, Max Planck Institute for Comparative Public and International Law
  • “The de facto regulated capacity of the state and state violence on digital platforms,” Kebene Wodajo, University of St. Gallen
  • “Transparencies, Accountabilities and Control: Reforming the international investment law regime,” Jarrod Wong, University of the Pacific McGeorge School of Law & Jason Yackee, University of Wisconsin School of Law
  • “Institutionalizing the Trade-Labor Nexus in Free Trade Agreements,” Yueming Yan, Singapore Management University
  • “Between Forbearance and Audacity: How the European Court redefined the norm against torture,” Ezgi Yildiz, Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies, Geneva
  • “Investor-State Dispute Settlement as An Avenue for Interactional Law-Making: An empirical study,” Chen Yu, National University of Singapore

Midyear Meeting Registration

Registration includes access to both the Practitioners’ Forum (on Thursday) and the Research Forum (on Friday and Saturday), as well as all breaks, lunches, and receptions noted in the agenda.

  ASIL Member Rate Non-Member Rate
Regular Member $225 $325 (ASIL membership available at additional cost)
Gov/IO/NGO Registration* $175 N/A
Speaker Registration $100 $250
Student Registration* ✝ $30 $65
*To qualify for reduced rates, attendees are required to provide a valid proof of identification to registration staff at time of check-in.

✝ Students from ASIL Academic Partner schools receive complimentary admission to the Midyear Meeting. (For a list of AP schools and to learn how to obtain the discount code, please visit here.)
All prices are in U.S. Dollars (USD)

Standalone Practitioners' Forum Registration

For those wishing to attend the Practitioners' Forum (Thursday, November 10, 2022) only.

ASIL Member Rate Non-Member Rate
$100 $125
All prices are in U.S. Dollars (USD)

PDF

REGISTRATION

How can I register?
You can register exclusively on our website: https://www.asil.org/midyear-meeting. There, you will also see the registration rates.

What is the registration deadline?
The registration deadline is Tuesday, November 8th, no later than 5:00pm ET.

I missed the registration deadline, can I register on-site on the first day of the Meeting?
No, you must register for the Midyear Meeting in advance. No same-day registrations or “walk-ins” will be accepted.

What is included in my registration?
You may register for all events of the Midyear Meeting, or register exclusively for the Practitioners’ Forum.

  • Registration for only the Practitioners’ Forum includes attendance at Thursday’s events: the keynote presentation; substantive sessions; and reception.
  • Registration for the Midyear Meeting includes access to the Practitioners’ Forum (all events listed above) and the Research Forum, as well as professional development training sessions on Friday morning; Friday and Saturday keynotes; lunch on Friday and Saturday; and receptions.

Can I register for only the Research Forum?
No. While you can register for only the Practitioners’ Forum, in order to attend the Research Forum, you must register for the Midyear Meeting as a whole. Special rates for the Research Forum only will not be given.

Are hotel charges included in registration fees?
No, hotel charges are not included in the registration fee. Attendees must book their own hotel arrangements separately [see hotel section of FAQs]. 

What is the cancellation policy?
Cancellations received on or before November 3rd, 2022, will be refunded 50% of your registration fee, less a $25 administrative fee to cover the cost of processing. No refunds will be available for cancellations made after November 3rd, 2022. All requests for cancellations must be made in writing to ASIL Services at services@asil.org.

Who qualifies for the Government, Non-governmental, and International Organization Rate?
To qualify for the Government/NGO/IO rate, you must be (a) a full-time employee of a U.S. or foreign government agency (federal, state, local or tribal) (government-supported universities or colleges, government contractors, and government consultants do not qualify);  (b) a full-time employee of a U.S. or foreign non-profit organization recognized by the United Nations; or (c) a full-time employee of an organization designated by the President of the United States through Executive Order to qualify for the privileges, exemptions, and immunities provided in the International Organizations Immunities Act.

I am a law student, do I receive a registration discount?
Law students from ASIL Academic Partner schools receive complimentary admission to the Midyear Meeting. See our website for a list of current Academic Partner schools. Reach out to your international law point of contact at your law school, who have the code to use during registration. If you have any issues, email services@asil.org. If your school is not an Academic Partner, the student rate is listed on the “Rates” tab on the Midyear Meeting website.

I am a speaker at the Midyear Meeting, do I receive a registration discount?
Yes, speakers are eligible for a discount. Please visit the “Rates” tab on our website: https://www.asil.org/midyear-meeting for details. If you have further questions, please reach out to your ASIL contact directly.

Am I eligible for a discount?
All of our rates, including discounts, are listed on our website: https://www.asil.org/midyear-meeting under the “Rates” tab. We will not be offering discounts other than those listed on the website.

 

HOTEL INFORMATION

What hotels does ASIL recommend?
A comprehensive list of hotel recommendations can be found as a drop-down on the Midyear Meeting webpage on the ASIL website.

 

TRANSPORTATION

Which airports should I fly into/out of for the conference? 
Miami International Airport is the closest airport to the University of Miami, where the Midyear Meeting events will take place. You can find more information about the airport here: https://www.miami-airport.com/.

What is the best method to get from the airport/train station to the Midyear Meeting locations?

  • Via car, it is roughly a 25 minute car ride from the airport to the University.
  • Via public transportation, it is roughly a 1 hour trip from the airport to the University, via bus and “Miami Mover” train.
  • Taxis and rental cars are available from the airport. 
  • Reach out to your hotel directly to inquire about a possible airport shuttle.



COVID-19 PROTOCOLS

What is ASIL’s Vaccination Policy for the Midyear Meeting?
Although the State of Florida prohibits us from requiring proof of vaccination for Midyear Meeting attendees, we strongly recommend that all persons who plan to attend the 2022 ASIL Midyear Meeting, including speakers, attendees, exhibitors, staff, guests, and vendors, be fully vaccinated, defined as a full course of a World Health Organization (WHO)-approved vaccine plus any boosters for which you are eligible, completed not later than two weeks before the Midyear Meeting.

What is ASIL’s Masking Policy for the Midyear Meeting?
Where possible, communal and social activities at the Midyear Meeting will be held outdoors. However, for activities taking place indoors, the Society strongly recommends that attendees wear a well-fitting disposable face mask, such as an N95 or KN95, securely covering the nose and mouth at all times. If you do not have a mask that meets these requirements, one will be provided to you free of charge.

What if there’s a spike in COVID-19 cases leading up to the Midyear Meeting?
The Society reserves the right to require masking indoors if the CDC determines that the COVID-19 Community Level for Miami-Dade County is high. Should you refuse to comply with this requirement, you will be asked to leave the Meeting.

 

CODE OF CONDUCT

What are the expectations for attendee conduct at the Midyear Meeting?
The Midyear Meeting of the American Society of International Law is a professional gathering of individuals interested in the study and practice of international law. As a global leader in advancing international law and justice, the Society is committed to ensuring its events promote a diverse, welcoming, and inclusive community that recognizes the inherent dignity and equality of all people.

The American Society of International Law prohibits discrimination, including discrimination based on age, citizenship, color, disability, ethnicity, gender, gender identity or expression, indigenous origin, marital status, nationality, national origin, race, religion, sexual orientation, socioeconomic or veteran status.

All attendees, including speakers, staff, exhibitors, and guests, are expected to conduct themselves with proper decorum and to respect the dignity of their fellow attendees. Disruptive or offensive behavior will not be permitted.

The Society does not tolerate discriminatory conduct or harassment in any form, whether verbal or non-verbal, in person or electronic, including derogatory or offensive language, intimidation, or unwanted physical contact.

What should I do if I see or experience discriminatory conduct or harassment?
Allegations of misconduct should be reported to a member of the Society’s staff at the registration desk or via email at services@asil.org. The Society reserves the right to take any action it deems appropriate to address violations of these Guidelines, including by reporting the alleged misconduct to the individual’s home institution, filing a police report, and removal and debarment from the Midyear Meeting.

 

GENERAL/MISCELLANEOUS

Will Internet/wifi access be available during the Midyear Meeting?
Yes, Internet/wifi access will be available to attendees. Login details will be provided on site.

What is the dress code for the Midyear Meeting?
Business attire is recommended for all Midyear Meeting sessions.

What is the weather in Miami, Florida during November?
The average daytime temperature is 81 degrees Fahrenheit (27 C) with evening lows of 68 degrees (20 C). Precipitation is unlikely (20% chance).

Will the Midyear Meeting be accessible?
The Society strives to ensure that the Midyear Meeting is accessible to all attendees. If you need assistance to register or to participate in the 2022 Midyear Meeting, please contact services@asil.org.

Will a nursing room be available?
Yes, a dedicated nursing room will be available for those who may need it. You may inquire at the Registration desk if you need help finding it in the event space.

Can I attend the Midyear Meeting virtually?
No, all Midyear Meeting events will be held in-person. You are unable to attend or participate virtually.

 

ADDITIONAL QUESTIONS

Please email ASIL’s Service Center, at services@asil.org or (202) 939-6001 with any additional questions.

Midyear Meeting Co-Chairs

  • Kathleen Claussen, University of Miami School of Law
  • Pedro Martinez-Fraga, Bryan Cave Leighton Paisner LLP

Midyear Meeting Host Committee

  • M. Cristina Cárdenas, Reed Smith LLP
  • Angel Cortiñas, Dentons
  • Dan Gonzalez, Hogan Lovells LLP
  • Peter Quinter, Gunster LLP
  • Melissa Pallett-Vasquez, Bilzin Sumberg LLP
  • C. Ryan Reetz, Bryan Cave Leighton Paisner LLP
  • Pablo Rueda Saiz, University of Miami School of Law
  • Cristina Pérez Soto, Jones Day LLP

Practitioners' Forum Co-Chairs

  • Simon Batifort, Curtis, Mallet-Prevost, Colt & Mosle LLP
  • Clara Brillembourg, Foley Hoag LLP
  • Christina Cerna, Principal Human Rights Specialist, Inter-American Commission on Human Rights, Organization of American States (Retired)

Research Forum Co-Chairs

  • Olabisi D. Akinkugbe, Schulich School of Law, Dalhousie University
  • Jorge Contesse, Rutgers Law School
  • Sonia Rolland, Northeastern University School of Law
PDF

*THE AVAILABILITY AND RATES AT THE FOLLOWING HOTELS ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE. ASIL DOES NOT HAVE HOTEL BLOCKS AT ANY OF THESE LOCATIONS AND CANNOT GUARANTEE AVAILABILITY.*

Courtyard by Marriott Miami Coral Gables
2051 S. LeJeune Road, Coral Gables, FL 33134
Phone: 305-443-2301 or 888-236-2427
Corporate Code: UOM
$149.00 – King Room
$149.00 – Double Queen Room
Courtyard Miami Coconut Grove
2649 South Bayshore Drive, Miami, FL 33133
Phone: 1-800-Marriott or 305-858-2500
Corporate Code: UOM
$144.00 – King Room
$144.00 – Double Queen Room
Hotel Arya
2889 McFarlane Road, Miami, FL 33133
Phone: 305-529-2828
Email: susett@hotelaryaCG.com
Corporate Code: Ask for UM Corporate Rate
$139 – Standard Room King City View
$159 – Deluxe Room City View
Mr. C Coconut Grove
2988 McFarlane Road, Coconut Grove, FL 33133
Phone: 305-800-6672
Email: reservations.coconutgrove@mrchotels.com
Corporate Code: UMMIAMI
$219.00 – Superior King & Double
$239.00 – Deluxe King
(Additional 15% off for Fridays & Saturdays)
Mutiny Hotel
2951 S. Bayshore Drive, Coconut Grove, FL 33133
Phone: 305-441-2100 ext 2005
Email: reservations@mutinyhotel.com
Corporate Code: SYNUM2
$129 - $209 – One Bedroom Suite Superior
$159 - $239 – One Bedroom Suite Deluxe
THesis Hotel Miami
350 South Dixie Highway, Coral Gables, FL, 33146
Phone: 305-667-5611
Corporate Code: UMIA
$322.00 – King
$339.00 – Double Queen

Complete list of UM discounted hotels.

Due to the Covid-19 pandemic, we have instituted special procedures to protect in-person attendees. These provisions are described below.

Vaccination Policy
Although the State of Florida prohibits us from requiring proof of vaccination for Midyear Meeting attendees, we strongly recommend that all persons who plan to attend the 2022 ASIL Midyear Meeting, including speakers, attendees, exhibitors, staff, guests, and vendors, be fully vaccinated, defined as a full course of a World Health Organization (WHO)-approved vaccine plus any boosters for which you are eligible, completed not later than two weeks before the Midyear Meeting.

Masking Policy
Where possible, communal and social activities at the Midyear Meeting will be held outdoors. However, for activities taking place indoors, the Society strongly recommends that attendees wear a well-fitting disposable face mask, such as an N95 or KN95, securely covering the nose and mouth at all times. If you do not have a mask that meets these requirements, one will be provided to you.

The Society reserves the right to require masking indoors if the CDC determines that the COVID-19 Community Level for Miami-Dade County is high. Should you refuse to comply with this requirement, you will be asked to leave the meeting.

 


Click to become a Midyear Meeting Sponsor

2022 ASIL Midyear Meeting Sponsorship Opportunities

BENEFITS FOR ALL LEVELS OF SPONSORSHIP

  • Acknowledgment in Midyear Meeting email and social media marketing announcements reaching approximately 4,000 ASIL members and affiliates. Acknowledgement in the Midyear Meeting app including banner ad and link to webpage of your choice.
  • Recognition in the on-site Midyear Meeting program distributed to each meeting attendee upon check-in (organization must confirm sponsorship by October 17, 2022, for inclusion).

PREMIER SPONSOR $2,000

  • Recognition as a Premier Sponsor in all Midyear Meeting materials, including signage, printed materials (program, flyers, Practitioners’ Forum and Research Forum marketing materials, etc.), the Midyear Meeting app, and the ASIL website with a hyperlink to your webpage of choice.
  • Five complimentary registrations (with CLE credits) for the Practitioners’ Forum and the two complimentary registrations for the Research Forum (including all sessions and receptions). ASIL member rate for additional registrations.
  • One-page Premier Sponsor ad in the Midyear Meeting Program Guide.
  • Recognition as a Midyear Premier Sponsor in the 2022 ASIL Annual Report.

FORUM SPONSOR $1,000

  • Recognition as a Forum Sponsor in all Midyear Meeting materials, including signage, printed materials (program, flyers, Practitioners’ Forum and Research Forum marketing materials, etc.), the Midyear Meeting app, and the ASIL website with a hyperlink to your webpage of choice.
  • Ten complimentary registrations (with CLE credits) for the Practitioners Forum and the two complimentary registrations for the Research Forum (including all sessions and receptions).  ASIL member rate for additional registrations.
  • A half-page ad in the Midyear Meeting Program.
  • Recognition as a Midyear Forum Sponsor in the 2022 ASIL Annual Report.
Click to become a Midyear Meeting Sponsor

For further information about Sponsorship Opportunities, or to create a custom sponsorship package, please contact Jack Karako, Director of Development at 202-939-6003 or jkarako@asil.org

The American Society of International Law is pleased to announce that it is accepting proposals from academic institutions interested in hosting the 2023 Midyear Meeting of the Society. The Midyear Meeting is held annually in late October or early November and encompasses several events, including leadership meetings of the Society's Executive Council and the Board of Editors of the American Journal of International Law; the Research Forum, which features cutting-edge international law scholarship by more than 70 authors; and the Practitioners’ Forum, focused on providing substantive international law programming to the local legal community. The Midyear Meeting has been held since 2010 in Miami, Los Angeles, Athens & Atlanta, New York, Chicago, Washington, DC, Seattle, St. Louis, and Brooklyn.

Institutions interested in hosting the 2023 Midyear Meeting should submit the requested information in a single PDF submission to submissions@asil.org by 5 p.m. ET on Monday, October 3, 2022.

The Request for Proposals can be downloaded here.