Terrorism

Pre-emptive Action to Forestall Terrorism

According to news reports, President Bush and his advisors are developing a new national security strategy based on pre-emptive action against terrorist groups and states that are trying to develop weapons of mass destruction.  It has been reported that the new policy reserves the right to act even if the threat is not judged to be imminent.  The pre-emptive action would not necessarily involve armed force, but that option is not ruled out.
 
Topic: 
Volume: 
7
Issue: 
8
Author: 
Frederic L. Kirgis
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The London Transportation System Bombings

The bombings of three trains in the London Underground (subway) system and of one London bus on July 7, 2005, have been denounced as terrorist attacks by world leaders and reported as terrorism by the media. Although there is still no all-encompassing definition of terrorism that is universally recognized in international law, it is apparent that these bombings would qualify legally as terrorism and that there are international ramifications.
 
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Volume: 
9
Issue: 
21
Author: 
Frederic L. Kirgis
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U.S. Ambassador Asserts National Self-Defense Under International Law in Benghazi Suspect Case (June 17, 2014)

Author: 
Nicole R. Tuttle

On June 17, 2014, the U.S. Ambassador, Samantha Power, wrote a letter to the U.N.

The Use of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (Drones) in United Nations Peacekeeping: The Case of the Democratic Republic of Congo

Inspired by the successes of unmanned drone (unmanned aerial vehicles or UAVs) surveillance of western countries, the United Nations Department of Peacekeeping Operations towards the end of 2012 announced that it intended to actually begin using such technology in peacekeeping operations.[1] Subsequently, in January 2013, the UN announced that it would deploy UAVs for surveillance in the Kivu provinces (North and South) of eastern Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) “to improve awareness and promote deterrence to those who move ar

Topic: 
Volume: 
18
Issue: 
13
Author: 
Kasaija Phillip Apuuli
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The Slow Demise of Impunity in Argentina and Chile

A series of extraordinary and closely inter-related judicial and non-judicial developments have unfolded in Chile and Argentina during the course of the past 12 months. Some thirty years since State-orchestrated civilian repression led to the disappearance, torture and death of thousands of individuals in both countries, leaving profound and still unhealed societal scars, the heretofore seemingly entrenched impunity for those offenses is only now being eroded.    
 
Argentina
 
Topic: 
Volume: 
9
Issue: 
1
Author: 
Peter A. Barcroft
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Fourth Circuit Hears Abu Ghraib Prison Torture Case (March 18, 2014)

Author: 
Emily MacKenzie

On March 18, 2014, the U.S.

European Parliament Passes Resolution on the Use of Armed Drones (February 25, 2014)

Author: 
Adom Malcolm Cooper

On February 25, 2014, the European Parliament passed a resolution on the use of ar