Trade and Investment

The Great Transformation and the Promise of International Economic Law

The Society's 114th Annual Meeting—and first Virtual Annual Meeting—took place June 25–26, 2020. The 2020 Annual Meeting theme, "The Promise of International Law," was an opportunity to reflect on the successes and failures of international law, while reaffirming our commitment to achieving its promise of a more just and peaceful world.

Promise or Peril? Towards an international data protection regime

The Society's 114th Annual Meeting—and first Virtual Annual Meeting—took place June 25–26, 2020. The 2020 Annual Meeting theme, "The Promise of International Law," was an opportunity to reflect on the successes and failures of international law, while reaffirming our commitment to achieving its promise of a more just and peaceful world.

Using Old Tools in New Ways: The New Economic World Order

The Society's 114th Annual Meeting—and first Virtual Annual Meeting—took place June 25–26, 2020. The 2020 Annual Meeting theme, "The Promise of International Law," was an opportunity to reflect on the successes and failures of international law, while reaffirming our commitment to achieving its promise of a more just and peaceful world.

Reforming the WTO through the Prism of Rules- versus Power-based Trade Relations

The Society's 114th Annual Meeting—and first Virtual Annual Meeting—took place June 25–26, 2020. The 2020 Annual Meeting theme, "The Promise of International Law," was an opportunity to reflect on the successes and failures of international law, while reaffirming our commitment to achieving its promise of a more just and peaceful world.

Australian Government Sued Over Lack of Disclosure of Climate Change-Related Investment Risks

Author: 
Emma Schoenberger

On July 22, 2020, lawyers for Kathleen O’Donnell filed a claim in the Federal Court of Australia against The Commonwealth of Australia, the Secretary to the Department of Treasury, and the Chief Ex

International Trade Dispute Settlement: Ready to Blossom Again?

Once called the crown’s jewel, the dispute settlement system of the WTO is facing a major threat.[1] The standing Appellate Body (AB), within the WTO Dispute Settlement Body (DSB), is not functioning normally—or even at all, as the United States has blocked all appointments of new AB members. As a result, cases can no longer be appealed, and this may leave decisions by the panels—which adjudicate the cases in the first instance—in legal limbo.

Topic: 
Volume: 
24
Issue: 
19
Author: 
Murilo Lubambo de Melo
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