Teaching International Law

Support for the Syrian Insurgency: What UN and International Norms Apply?

This course is the last installment of three programs in a series cosponsored by the American Society of International Law in partnership with the United Nations Association of the National Capital Area’s International Law Committee to address the issue of the use of force. When is it permissible? What is the role of the UN and how can it be carried out?

Grotian Moments and Accelerated Formation of Customary International Law

This discussion examines the concept of accelerated formation of customary international law and its application to humanitarian intervention and to drone strikes against terrorists. It features George Washington University Law School Professor Sean Murphy, a member of the UN International Law Commission, and Case Western Reserve University School of Law Professor Michael Scharf, author of the new book Customary International Law in Times of Fundamental Change: Recognizing Grotian Moments published by ASIL Publisher Partner Cambridge University Press.

High School Curriculum

As the breadth of standardized examination requirements grows, international and human rights law is finding less and less room and nearly no mention in today’s high schools. To fill this gap, ASIL has created teaching modules modules designed for integration into existing history and civics curricula.

Supreme Court May Consider How Broadly the “Necessary and Proper” Clause of the Constitution Authorizes Legislation to Implement Treaties

Introduction

On January 18, 2013, the U.S. Supreme Court (Supreme Court) granted certiorari in Bond v. United States.  The Court set the questions presented as:

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17
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9
Author: 
Ronald J. Bettauer
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International Law and Foreign Laws in the U.S. State Legislatures

Introduction

Beginning in 2010, legislators in half of the U.S. states proposed—and in two states adopted—a series of bills or state constitutional amendments designed to restrict the use of international law and foreign laws by state (and sometimes federal) courts.  This Insight will summarize the trend in adopting legislation hostile to international law and foreign laws and briefly discuss its causes and consequences.

State Bills and Proposed Constitutional Amendments

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15
Issue: 
13
Author: 
Aaron Fellmeth
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Google, China, and Search

I. Introduction

Google’s recent decision to stop censoring its search results in China reflects the challenging position in which providers of information and communication technologies find themselves today. This Insight provides an overview of the debate about Google’s provision of search services in China and describes the framework of corporate social responsibility that applies to Internet providers operating in countries that restrict expression online.

II. Internet Regulation in China

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14
Issue: 
25
Author: 
Molly Beutz Land
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Special Elections to Fill Vacancies on the International Court of Justice

Introduction

The past several months have given rise to a number of high-level judicial resignations. While the media has been saturated with commentary regarding the retirement of Justice John Paul Stevens from the United States Supreme Court, of equally profound interest to international legal observers is the retirement of two judges from the International Court of Justice in The Hague, the Netherlands (“the ICJ” or “the Court”) – Judge Thomas Buergenthal of the United States and Judge Shi Jiuyong of China.

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Volume: 
14
Issue: 
14
Author: 
Natalya Scimeca
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