Science and Technology

International Law and the E. coli Outbreaks in Europe

Introduction

Many European countries have experienced outbreaks caused by a dangerous strain of Escherichia coli (E. coli) bacteria, and two countries have, to date, reported deaths related to these outbreaks. Responses have involved actions that implement and affect international legal regimes on public health and international trade. This Insight describes these E. coli outbreaks and the international legal issues the outbreaks have raised.

The European E. coli Outbreaks

Topic: 
Volume: 
15
Issue: 
14
Author: 
David P. Fidler
PDF Version: 
Image: 

The Google Book Settlement and International Intellectual Property Law

Introduction

Topic: 
Volume: 
15
Issue: 
9
Author: 
Daniel Gervais
PDF Version: 
Image: 

Advisory Opinion of the Seabed Disputes Chamber of International Tribunal for the Law of the Sea on “Responsibilities and Obligations of States Sponsoring Persons and Entities With Respect To Activities in the Area”

Introduction

Topic: 
Volume: 
15
Issue: 
7
Author: 
David Freestone
PDF Version: 
Image: 

The Cancún Climate Conference

I. Introduction

The United Nations Climate Change Conference, held from November 29 to December 11, 2010, in Cancún, Mexico, relaunched the United Nation's multilateral facilitation role. Delegates agreed to aspects of a global framework to help developing countries curb their carbon output and cope with the effects of climate change, but they postponed the harder question of precisely how industrialized and major emerging economies will share the task of making deeper greenhouse-gas emission cuts.

Topic: 
Volume: 
15
Issue: 
2
Author: 
Cesare Romano and Elizabeth Burleson
PDF Version: 
Image: 
Organizations of Note: 

The 2010 Nagoya-Kuala Lumpur Supplementary Protocol: A New Treaty Assigning Transboundary Liability and Redress for Biodiversity Damage Caused by Genetically Modified Organisms

Introduction

Topic: 
Volume: 
15
Issue: 
1
Author: 
Anastasia Telesetsky
Image: 

The International Law of Drones

Introduction

When humans first launched themselves into the air to attack their enemies, they used balloons. Later came planes and helicopters. The latest development in the area of airborne attacks takes the human operator out of the air. People may operate unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs or drones) thousands of miles from the drone’s location.[1]

Topic: 
Volume: 
14
Issue: 
37
Author: 
Mary Ellen O’Connell
Image: 

Google, China, and Search

I. Introduction

Google’s recent decision to stop censoring its search results in China reflects the challenging position in which providers of information and communication technologies find themselves today. This Insight provides an overview of the debate about Google’s provision of search services in China and describes the framework of corporate social responsibility that applies to Internet providers operating in countries that restrict expression online.

II. Internet Regulation in China

Topic: 
Volume: 
14
Issue: 
25
Author: 
Molly Beutz Land
PDF Version: 
Image: 
Organizations of Note: 

The Swine Flu Outbreak and International Law

A new swine influenza virus is causing outbreaks in humans in Mexico, the United States, and Canada, and the virus has possibly spread to other countries. This outbreak has alarmed public health officials because of its epidemiological characteristics, which indicate that the virus may be able to cause a pandemic.

Topic: 
Volume: 
13
Issue: 
5
Author: 
David P. Fidler
Image: 

International Law Commission Adopts Draft Articles of a Transboundary Aquifers Convention

Introduction

Topic: 
Volume: 
12
Issue: 
18
Author: 
Kerstin Mechlem
Image: 

North Korean Links to Building of a Nuclear Reactor in Syria: Implications for International Law

The Bush administration has alleged that North Korea provided assistance to Syria's efforts to build a nuclear reactor, which Israeli warplanes attacked and destroyed on September 6, 2007.[1] The U.S.

Topic: 
Volume: 
12
Issue: 
8
Author: 
Daniel Joyner
Image: