2014 Meeting

HISTORIC 2014 ASIL ANNUAL MEETING & ILA BIENNIAL CONFERENCE
For the first time in its history, ASIL is partnering with the American Branch of the International Law Association (ILA) to combine each organization's major conference into an extraordinary joint event. This unprecedented ASIL Annual Meeting and ILA Biennial Conference will take place April 7-12, 2014, in Washington, DC, and will represent a unique and historic gathering of the international law community. Updates about the conference, expected to be one of the largest in international law history, will be posted here, as they become available.

Ronald Reagan Building and International Trade Center
1300 Pennsylvania Avenue NW
Washington, DC 20004
2014 JOINT CONFERENCE PROGRAM THEME: The Effectiveness of International Law

International law today touches on nearly every aspect of our lives, from the price of practically everything we purchase, to the health of the environment that surrounds us, to our ability to communicate seamlessly worldwide. These encounters serve as daily reminders that, as Louis Henkin famously put it, "almost all nations observe almost all principles of international law and almost all of their obligations almost all of the time."

Yet at the same time, there are regular reminders that not all nations, groups, or individuals observe all principles of international law or all of their obligations all of the time. International law violations such as human rights abuses, trade law breaches, and law of armed conflict violations remain all too common.

When, how, and why is international law most effective? Are there greater challenges to effectiveness in some areas of international law practice than in others? If so, what are they, and how can they be addressed? What role do domestic and international courts play in enforcing international law and thus enhancing its effectiveness? Does the increasingly intertwined transnational economy offer tools that may be used to enforce international law against states and individuals, or does it instead make international law more vulnerable by making evasion of national authority simpler? Do the challenges facing international law vary in different parts of the world, and, if so, how might those challenges be met? What role do non-state actors—non-governmental organizations and corporations chief among them—play in making international law more or less effective? And what role should they play?

The 2014 joint ASIL Annual Meeting and ILA Biennial Conference will address these questions.

Welcome Message from ASIL and the ILA

Full Program

Program Highlights

Opening Plenary: The Rt. Hon. Lord Mance, Chair, Executive Council of the International Law Association


Grotius Lecture: Radhika Coomaraswamy, former UN Special Representative of the Secretary General on Children and Armed Conflict; former UN Special Rapporteur on Violence against Women


WILIG Luncheon: Remarks: Justice Sandra Day O'Connor, US Supreme Court (retired); Honorees: ICJ Judges Julia Sebutinde, Joan Donoghue, and Hanquin Xue, Thursday, April 10, 2014


Brower Lecture: Sundaresh Menon, Chief Justice of Singapore

Hudson Medal Luncheon: A Conversation with Hudson Medal Winner Alain Pellet, University Paris Ouest, Friday, April 11, 2014

Friday Plenary: A Conversation with ICJ Judges Joan Donoghue, Julie Sebutinde, and Xue Hanqin


ILA Committees and Working Groups: Click here to view the work program of the ILA's 22 committees and 9 study groups, to be discussed at the 2014 meeting.

Program Sessions: More than 40 program sessions will address topics, such as:

  • The Approach of Courts to Foreign Affairs and National Security
  • Everybody Come Together Over Me: Systematic Integration and Vienna Convention Article 31(3)(c)
  • Intelligence Material and the Courts
  • The Internet and International Law
  • Domestic Human Rights Enforcement after Kiobel
  • The Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform Act's Turn to International Law
  • The Effectiveness of International Law Governing Cyberspace
  • The Effectiveness of the WTO in Dealing with Climate Change and Energy Initiatives

MONDAY, APRIL 7, 2014

12:15 – 1:15 p.m.       Lunch
                                    Buffet lunch available for purchase with registration.

1:15 – 2:45 p.m.         Open Working Sessions: ILA Committees/Study Groups

  • Feminism and International Law

The global financial crisis adds a piquancy and immediacy to the current work of the ILA Committee on Feminism and International Law. In its report for the Washington Conference the Committee will discuss the question of Positive Obligations of States Parties in relation to Substantive Equality. Acknowledging the multi-faceted nature of the topic, as well as the indivisibility of rights, the Committee will focus on the sub-theme of Equal Remuneration and Equal Access to Economic Activities, examining relevant positive obligations that enjoin States to take measures in the economic sphere. The importance of both negative obligations (to 'respect' human rights) and positive obligations (to 'protect' and 'fulfil' human rights) is increasingly recognised in international human rights law and practice. The duty to protect relates to third parties. It requires States to ensure that third parties (including other individuals and corporations) do not deprive people of the guaranteed right. The duty to fulfil is a positive obligation with two strands: the obligation to facilitate and the obligation to provide. It mandates States to establish political, economic, and social systems that enable right-holders to enjoy a right through their own means (facilitate), and/or an obligation to directly provide what is required in cases where a right-holder does not have the assets or the opportunity to take care of her or himself.  The working session will discuss some of the international instruments examined, and their domestic application with a view to teasing out the impact of the positive obligations identified.

  • International Monetary Law
  • Preferential Trade Agreements (Study Group)

The newly established study group on preferential trade agreements will convene for the first time. The meeting aims at laying ground for future work by elaborating a common understanding of relevant questions and by determining issues to be addressed. The possible outcome of the group as well as future events and a timeline shall be discussed. Furthermore, the group will briefly take stock of recent developments in the field including a Conference to be organized in Göttingen, Germany in early March.

2:45 – 3:00 p.m.         Break

3:00 – 4:30 p.m.         Open Working Sessions: ILA Committees/Study Groups (Continued)

  • Feminism and International Law
  • International Monetary Law
  • Committee on Complementarity in International Criminal Law
    The meeting will explore which aspects of complementarity in international criminal law the Committee should concentrate on in its initial work, including complementarity as a standard and practice of admissibility at the International Criminal Court; the extent to which developing national ability to prosecute core international crimes (by some referred to as 'positive complementarity') is of concern to international criminal law and justice; and the relationship between the principle of complementarity and possible subsidiarity between national criminal jurisdictions for core international crimes.

5:00 – 6:30 p.m.         Opening Plenary
Remarks by:

  • The Rt. Hon. Lord Mance, Chair, Executive Council of the International Law Association
  • Alexander Yankov, Outgoing President, International Law Association
  • Ruth Wedgwood, President, American Branch of the International Law Association; Chair, International Law Association Biennial Conference 2014
  • Marcel Brus, Director of Studies, International Law Association
  • Donald Donovan, President, American Society of International Law
  • Mary McLeod, Acting Legal Adviser, U.S. Department of State

6:30 – 8:30 p.m.         Reception

TUESDAY, APRIL 8, 2014

9:00 – 10:30 a.m.       Open Working Sessions: ILA Committees/Study Groups

  • Baselines under the International Law of the Sea

The Committee on Baselines under the International Law of the Sea had its original mandate extended from 2012 to 2016 to permit consideration of straight baselines. The Committee's initial work focussed on the normal baseline, as provided for in Article 5 of the 1982 United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea. The Committee's current work has considered straight baselines in two particular contexts. First, the interpretation and relevant state practice of Article 7 of the Convention regarding the method adopted by States of drawing straight baselines. Second, the interpretation and relevant state practice of Article 47 of the Convention regarding the method adopted by States in the drawing of archipelagic baselines. The Working Session will discuss these two questions with particular reference to the history of straight baselines, state practice, relevant decisions of international courts and tribunals, and the views of publicists, and conclusions reached by the Committee on these matters.

  • Business and Human Rights (Study Group)
  • Islamic Law and International Law

Co-sponsored by the ASIL Human Rights Interest Group
The ILA Committee on Islamic Law and International Law will continue the discussion on the 'rule of law' which is reflected in its Report of 2012. This year, it will focus on the issue of 'freedom of expression' and the 'rule of law'. Starting from the premises of the freedom of expression as a human right which is contained in various international human rights documents, such as the ICCPR, the ECHR, the ACHR and the Banjul Charter, it will analyze to what extent it is also recognized under Islamic law. On the one hand, traditional sources of Islamic law containing elements of the freedom of expression will be presented and discussed. On the other hand, contemporary documents on human rights in Islam and their relevance in and for Islamic States will be analyzed. Several presentations will deal with the respective aspects: Freedom of Expression in International Human Rights Law, Islamic State Practices and Islamic Law (Javaid Rehman), The Rule of Law and Freedom of Expression: Discussing Permissible Limitations from Human Rights and Islamic Perspectives (Irmgard Marboe), Freedom of Expression within Sharia (Hossein Esmaeili) and Islamic Law Perspectives: The OIC (Katja Samuel).

  • The Legal Principles Relating to Climate Change

In the open session the ILA Committee on "Legal Principles Relating to Climate Change" will present its Third (Final) Report which was prepared for the Washington Congress. The Third (Final) Report takes the form of Draft Articles and Commentaries. The Rapporteur and Committee members will briefly introduce the work of the Committee as well as provide an overview of the Draft Articles and Commentaries with a view to persuading the ILA to adopt these as an ILA Declaration of the Legal Principles Relating to Climate Change."

  • Principles on the Engagements of Domestic Courts with International Law (Study Group)

The ILA Study Group on Principles on the Engagement of Domestic Courts with International Law will discuss developments in its work towards their Final Report. Since the presentation of its Preliminary Report at the 2012 Conference in Sofia, the Study Group has been gathering a number of thematic and national reports, both from Study Group members and from independent researchers, which aim to map principles of engagement of domestic courts with international law according to the categories identified in the Preliminary Report. The co-rapporteurs will present a draft final report on the basis of this work and discuss it with a panel of invited experts and the audience.

  • Space Law

This Committee has an established and continuing relationship with the UN institutions dealing with space law. In addition to these activities the topics under the new mandate of the ILA Space Law Committee (2012- 2016) will be addressed in a First Report as follows:
Part 1 (to be presented by the Chair)
  (a) Dispute settlement and the 2011 PCA Rules for Arbitration.
  (b) The use of satellite in court and other applications, with emphasis on international boundary disputes and issues of privacy.
  (c)  New developments on space debris with special reference to space debris removal.
Part 2 (to be presented by the Rapporteur)
  (d) Legal problems of private commercial manned suborbital flights.
Part Three: general discussion of all topics.

10:30 – 10:45 a.m.     Break

10:45 – 12:15 p.m.     Open Working Sessions: ILA Committees/Study Groups (Continued)

  • Baselines under the International Law of the Sea
  • Business and Human Rights (Study Group)
  • Islamic Law and International Law
  • The Legal Principles Relating to Climate Change
  • Principles on the Engagements of Domestic Courts with International Law (Study Group)
  • Space Law

12:30 – 2:00 p.m.       Lunch
                                    Buffet lunch available for purchase with registration.

2:15 – 3:45 p.m.         Open Working Sessions: ILA Committees/Study Groups

  • International Human Rights Law
  • International Protection of Consumers

The discussion will focus first on current instruments on the international protection of consumers, including the revision of the UN Guidelines on Consumer Protection, the UN World Tourism Organization and the protection of foreign tourists in case of emergency situation / force majeur and other new developments in national and international rules on the international protection of consumers. Secondly, we will discuss our preliminary findings regarding the roles of international organizations regarding consumer protection, such as the European Union, the UN World Tourism Organization, the World Bank, the Hague Conference on Private International Law (in particular the Brazilian proposal of a Draft Convention on Co-operation in Respect of Tourists and Visitors Abroad), the UNCITRAL Working Group on consumer arbitration. Thirdly, we will direct our attention to the future work of the committee including the final report of this committee and the publication of a book on international protection of consumers.

  • Nuclear Weapons, Non-Proliferation & Contemporary International Law

This Session will address Legal Aspects of Nuclear Disarmament, as developed in the Committee's Report. It will also provide an opportunity to discuss further activities to be taken under the Committee's mandate, 'to consider legal approaches to non-proliferation and regulating nuclear weapons within the contemporary context and, ultimately, to present options for future legal cooperation in this field'.

  • Recognition/Non-Recognition in International Law
  • Teaching of International Law (Working Group)

Informal Discussion:
"What Determines the Interest (or lack thereof) of the ILA and ASIL in Teaching." Led by John Gamble
• Former Executive Director, ASIL: Charlotte Ku, Professor of Law, University of Illinois
• Former Director of Studies, ILA: Fred Soons, Professor of International Law, University of  Utrecht
Presentation:
"Teaching the Basics of International Law in the Digital Age"
Math Nortmann, Professor in International Relations and Public International Law, School of Law, Oxford Brookes University, Oxford, U.K.
Presentation:
"Preliminary Results of the 2014 Survey on the Teaching of International Law,"
John Gamble, Chair, ILA Interest Group on Teaching
Open discussion:
How can professional societies cultivate and sustain an interest in the teaching of international law.

 

3:45 – 4:00 p.m.         Break

4:00 – 5:30 p.m.         Open Working Sessions: ILA Committees/Study Groups (Continued)

  • International Human Rights Law
  • International Protection of Consumers
  • Nuclear Weapons, Non-Proliferation & Contemporary International Law
  • Recognition/Non-Recognition in International Law
  • Teaching of International Law (Working Group)

6:00 – 8:00 p.m.         Reception      

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 9, 2014
7:00 – 8:30 a.m.         ASIL Interest Group Meetings

9:00 – 12:00 p.m.       ASIL Executive Council Orientation
Invitation only.

9:00 – 10:30 a.m.       Open Working Sessions: ILA Committees/Study Groups

  • Due Diligence in International Law (Study Group)                             
  • Intellectual Property and Private International Law

In the open session the ILA Committee on "Intellectual Property and Private International Law" will present its Second Report which was prepared for the Washington Congress. In the first part of the session the Coordinators will give a brief introduction of the Committee activities focusing on the current state of draft Recommendations for the establishment of a more efficient framework to adjudicate cross-border intellectual property disputes. The second part of the session will be devoted for follow-up presentations by the members of the Committee on recent developments related to jurisdiction, choice of law, recognition and enforcement and other issues in cross-border IP litigation.

  • International Trade Law
  • Socially Responsible Investment (Study Group)

Following the inaugural meeting of the Study Group on Socially Responsible Investment (SRI)  in Sofia, the Study Group has organized phone conferences to discuss current SRI developments and issues. Topics of interest have included international law conventions which focus on banning weapons such as cluster munitions or landmines, and how they interact with international soft law instuments such as codes of conduct or investment principles. The Group plans to address the following questions:

  • Is the existence of soft law measures sufficient?
  • Are these measures effectively enforced?
  • How should indirect investments be managed?
  • Is the broader public adequately informed about the SRI issue?
  • How far does public pressure exercise an influence on the practices of investment firms?
  • Will it be necessary to define and introduce conventions or statutes regulating this investment firms' behaviour at the supranational/national level in the medium term?
  • Sovereign Bankruptcy (Study Group) Moot: Improving Sovereign Debt Workouts -- by Contract or by Treaty?

The study group on sovereign bankruptcy is composed of practitioners, academics and public and private sector representatives with decades of experience in representing creditors, states and other interested parties in sovereign bankruptcies. In its work of the last four years, the group has addressed central challenges in contemporary sovereign debt restructurings, including creditor coordination and information sharing. In this moot, the Treaty Team, led by Lee Buchheit of Cleary Gottlieb (New York), will argue that the efficient resolution of future sovereign bankruptcies requires the intervention of transnational law in some form. Conversely, the Contractual Team, led by Deborah Zandstra of Clifford Chance (London), will make the case that future sovereign debt restructurings can and should be addressed efficiently through the use of contractual mechanisms. A tribunal composed of three distinguished judges will decide – based solely on the arguments presented at this moot court – which team has presented the stronger case. This format is designed to expose the two streams to challenge and circulate ideas on how sovereign debt restructurings could be improved to a broader audience.

  • Use of Force

9:00 – 10:30 a.m.       ASIL Interest Group Business Meetings

  • International Organizations Interest Group
  • Rights of Indigenous Peoples Interest Group                              

10:30 – 10:45 a.m.     Break

10:45 - 12:15 p.m.      Open Working Sessions: ILA Committees/Study Groups (Continued)

  • Due Diligence in International Law (Study Group)                             
  • Intellectual Property and Private International Law
  • International Trade Law
  • Socially Responsible Investment (Study Group)
  • Sovereign Bankruptcy (Study Group) Moot: Improving Sovereign Debt Workouts -- by Contract or by Treaty?
  • Use of Force

12:30 – 2:00 p.m.       Lunch
Buffet lunch available for purchase with registration.

12:00 – 1:00 p.m.       Institute for Transnational Arbitration Luncheon

1:00 – 4:30 p.m.         Institute for Transnational Arbitration-American Society of International Law Conference: Mass and Class Claims in Arbitration
(separate registration required. Please visit: http://www.cailaw.org/Institute-for-Transnational-Arbitration/Events/2014/ita-asil.html)

1:45 – 3:15 p.m.         Open Working Sessions: ILA Committees/Study Groups

  • Cultural Heritage Law
  • International Securities Regulation

The International Securities Regulation Committee will cover recent developments in legislation and rule-making.  This will focus on post-financial crisis regulation and, in particular:

  • An update from the Committee's Sofia Report on global derivatives regulation across the US, EU and Asia – describing the G20 derivatives initiatives, and reporting on progress towards harmonization and substituted compliance.  Is regulation in this area becoming increasingly Balkanized?
  • An update from the Sofia meeting on recovery and resolution of Non-Bank Non-Insurance Systemically Important Financial Institutions
  • A report from the UK – following the Kay Report, progress on setting up an Investor Forum to encourage a dialogue with companies on strategic issues and reinforce their long term focus, as well as serving as an escalation forum for institutional investors to collectively engage with companies.  The report will focus on legal and regulatory issues that could impede the operation of such a forum, and possible solutions.
  • The Committee also will be meeting with members of the SEC staff from the Office of International Affairs, Division of Corporation Finance and Division of Trading and Markets at the request of the ILA Committee.
  • Non-State Actors

The Committee will have a final discussion on the 3rd (draft) Report which was prepared by its co-rapporteurs Cedric Ryngaert and Jean d'Aspremont. The focus of the discussion is the report's understanding of "conceptual pluralism" of the actor based approach with respect to the "difficulties inherent in a more holistic approach based on the current concept of international responsibility. From that discussion, the Committee will proceed to setting out the trajectory for the next two years which will result in the 4th and final report. In order to broaden participation, the Committee will also have an open meeting in order to engage with other interested scholars and practioners.

  • Reparation for Victims of Armed Conflict

Program Sessions
Corporate Responsibility and Human Rights
Co-sponsored by the ASIL Africa, Human Rights, International Environmental Law and International Legal Research Interest Groups
This panel will examine the effectiveness of international human rights norms in regulating the conduct of businesses. Participants will discuss challenges facing industries with regard to human rights due diligence and impacts on indigenous peoples; the need to clarify the jurisdictional scope of a state's duty to regulate and adjudicate on activities of industries abroad; resolution of disputes under international treaties; and the effectiveness of non-judicial grievance procedures.
            Speakers:

  • Sara Seck, Faculty of Law, University of Western Ontario
  • Ben Juratowitch, Freshfields Bruckhaus Deringer, LLP
  • Rachel Davis, Shift

Moderator:

  • S. James Anaya, The University of Arizona College of Law; UN Special Rapporteur on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples

1:45  – 2:45 pm          Connecting the Dots: Visualizing International Law
Sponsored by the ASIL International Legal Research Interest Group
Co-sponsored by the International Law and Technology Interest Group
Visualization and database technology are providing new tools to enhance empirically-based arguments in legal and policy areas, advancing the goal of making international law more effective. The presentation of complex "Big Data" in databases such as the World Justice Project's Rule of Law Index and the Global Health and Human Rights Database can render a sophisticated range of concepts more intelligible. Dynamic, visual tools are enhancing dialogue as well as aiming to improve teaching, communication, and problem-solving in the transnational legal context. Three projects will be presented visually and discussed in a panel format in order to demonstrate their interactive and persuasive power.
            Speakers:

  • Oscar A. Cabrera, O'Neill Institute for National and Global Health Law, Georgetown Law
  • Jeffrey B. Ritter, Georgetown University Law Center
  • Alejandro Ponce, World Justice Project

Moderator:

  • Marylin Raisch, John Wolff International & Comparative Law Library, Georgetown University Law Center

2:45 – 3:15 p.m.         ASIL International Legal Research Interest Group Business Meeting

3:15 – 3:30 p.m.         Break

3:30 – 5:00 p.m.         Open Working Sessions: ILA Committees/Study Groups (Continued)

  • Cultural Heritage Law
  • International Securities Regulation
  • Non-State Actors
  • Reparation for Victims of Armed Conflict

Program Sessions
Is International Law Effective? The Case of Russia and Ukraine
Recent events in Ukraine have raised a number of complex questions about the effectiveness of international law.  Is the UN Charter's collective security system powerless in the face of the determined action of a member of the P5?  Do EU and U.S. economic sanctions offer an effective alternative response to what many consider Russia's illegal actions in Crimea?  What role does international law's commitment to self-determination play in evaluating the lawfulness of the secession of Crimea and its annexation by Russia in the wake of a popular referendum?  Does the claim that a democratically elected (though deposed) Head of State of Ukraine issued an invitation to Russia offer any legal justification for the military intervention? Do claims that intervention was necessary for the defense of nationals carry any weight?  How should we evaluate President Vladmir Putin's reference to events in Kosovo, Iraq, and Libya as precedents for Russia's actions in Crimea?  The panel will consider these questions and seek to offer insight into the implications of recent events in Ukraine for the effectiveness of international law—particularly the prohibition on the use of force and protection of the territorial integrity of sovereign states.

Moderator: Lori Fisler Damrosch, Columbia Law School

Speakers:
  • Simon Chesterman, National University of Singapore
  • Anatoly Kapustin
  • Nina Khrushcheva, The New School
  • Peter Olson, former NATO legal adviser

The Fourth Restatement of Foreign Relations Law of the United States
Co-sponsored by the ASIL International Law in Domestic Courts and
International Legal Research Interest Groups and the ASIL Lieber Society on the Law of Armed Conflict
The American Law Institute has undertaken to publish a Fourth Restatement of the Foreign Relations Law of the United States. What has the function of the Restatement been in the past, and what is its value today? What should be preserved, and what corrections and revisions are needed? The Reporters are among those who will address these questions.

Speakers:

  • Paul Stephan, University of Virginia Law School
  • Lance Liebman, Columbia Law School
  • Sarah Cleveland, Columbia Law School
  • Georg Nolte, Humboldt University

            
The Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform Act's Turn To International Law
Co-sponsored by the ASIL Africa and International Economic Law Interest
Groups
The Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform Act exemplifies the increasing influence of international law and norms on domestic regulation. For example, the Act's conflict minerals provisions support international standards on supply chain transparency and emerging norms on business and human rights, and its derivatives reform requirements rely for content on international financial regulation. Evaluating the success of applying international rules and norms to the financial industry will in part turn on the domestic regulations implemented pursuant to the Act. This panel will explore the opportunities and challenges of that implementation. 

Speakers:

  • Michael Barr, University of Michigan Law School
  • Galit Sarfaty, University of British Columbia Faculty of Law
  • David Zaring, The Wharton School, University of Pennsylvania
  • Jonathan Macey, Yale Law School

Moderator:

  • Christopher Brummer, Georgetown Law School

5:00 – 6:30 p.m.         Grotius Lecture: Radhika Coomaraswamy, former U.N. Under Secretary-General and Special Representative of the Secretary General for Children and Armed Conflict and Special Rapporteur on Violence Against Women

Discussant: Diane Marie Amann, Emily and Ernest Woodruff Chair in International Law, University of Georgia School of Law; Special Adviser on Children in Armed Conflict, International Criminal Court, Office of the Prosecutor

Co-sponsored by American University Washington College of Law and the ASIL
Africa and International Refugee Law Interest Groups

6:30 – 8:00 p.m.         Grotius Reception
Co-sponsored by American University Washington College of Law

7:00 p.m.                    Embassy Night:  Receptions for Meeting Attendees at their National               Embassies
Inquire at Registration if your Embassy is hosting a reception.

6:40 – 8:00 p.m.         AJIL Board Business Meeting
Invitation only.

7:00 – 8:30 p.m.         ASIL New Professionals Interest Group Business Meeting

8:00 – 10:00 p.m.       AJIL Board Dinner
Invitation only.

THURSDAY, APRIL 10, 2014
7:00 – 8:30 a.m.         ASIL New Member Breakfast

                                    ASIL UN21 Interest Group Business Meeting

9:00 – 10:30 a.m.       Open Working Sessions: ILA Committees/Study Groups

  • International Commercial Arbitration

The Arbitration Committee intends to present a final report and recommendations on the current project "Inherent Powers of Arbitral
Tribunals" in DC. The co-reporters Mark Friedman and Luca Radicati and the Chair, Filip de Ly will present the outcome of our activities.

  • Role of International Law in Sustainable Natural Resource Management for Development

Sustainable use of natural resources is probably the core principle emanating from the international law in the field of sustainable development. It has a firm status in treaty law and is frequently applied in international judicial decisions. The Committee session will examine its specific legal status and the way it is reflected in recent policy documents, such as the Rio+20 outcome document The Future We Want and the post-2015 development agenda. Furthermore, attention will be paid to new treaty regimes and the practice of States and international organizations in the field of sustainable use of natural resources and to the Whaling case before the International Court of Justice.

  • Role of Soft Law Instruments in International Investment Law (Study Group)

The ILA Study Group on the Role of Soft-Law Instruments in International Investment Law, established in 2008, will meet for its concluding session at the April 2014 Conference. It was set up with the mandate "to study the development of soft law instruments in international investment law and the feasibility of a 'codification' of the present state of this field of international economic law". The Group produced a "feasibility study" entitled "International Investment Law and Soft Law" and published in 2012 by Edward Elgar. The Washington Meeting 2014 will offer an opportunity to discuss these findings and to consider future activities in the field within the ILA.

  • International Law and Sea Level Rise

The prospect of climate change induced sea-level rise, with the consequent loss of all or of parts of state territory, raises a number of fundamental considerations touching on a wide range of international law issues, including the law of the sea, statehood, nationality, and human rights. The Committee will discuss the implications under international law of the partial and complete inundation of state territory in particular of small island and low-lying states, and the possible displacement, migration or planned relocation of their inhabitants.

 

Program Sessions
The Approach of Courts to Foreign Affairs and National Security
This panel seeks to explore the different approaches that domestic courts have taken to judicial review of international affairs, including foreign policy and national security. This judicial panel will explore the degree to which their courts decline to review such matters on grounds of jurisdiction, justiciability, separation of powers etc.
            Speakers:

  • Kenneth Keith, International Court of Justice
  • Jonathan Mance, Supreme Court of the United Kingdom
  • Brett Kavanaugh, U.S. Court of Appeals – D.C. Circuit

Moderator:

  • Ruth Wedgwood, Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies

Countermeasures in Cyberspace
Co-sponsored by the ASIL International Law and Technology Interest Group and the ASIL Lieber Society on the Law of Armed Conflict
Cyber-attacks have become increasingly common over the course of the last decade.  Many state-sponsored cyber-attacks violate the prohibition on the use or threat of force in Article 2(4) of the United Nations Charter. Yet such rarely rise to the level of an "armed attack" sufficient to trigger the victim state's Article 51 right to self defense.  In the face of this void, new debate has emerged about the legality of the use of countermeasures in response to cyber-attacks.  What countermeasures are permitted?  Are only "defensive" countermeasures legally permissible, or are more "active" countermeasures allowed?  What are the limits to such active countermeasures?  May private actors respond with countermeasures, or may only states undertake such actions?
            Speakers:

  • Mike Schmitt, US Naval War College & University of Exeter
  • Alexandra Perina, Council on Foreign Relations
  • Joseph Hall, Center for Democracy & Technology
  • Shu Wenqi, Law School of Renmin University of China

                                                Moderator:

  • Eric Greenwald, White House National Security Staff

Interpretive Complexity and the International Humanitarian Law Principle of Proportionality
Co-sponsored by the ASIL International Refugee Law, TJ ROL and UN21 Interest Groups and the ASIL Lieber Society on the Law of Armed Conflict
The principle of proportionality in international humanitarian law (IHL) is a requirement to desist from forcible action where incidental harm to civilians "would be excessive in relation to the concrete and direct military advantage anticipated." The components of this definition are contested, and proportionality's effectiveness arguably depends on the accuracy of intelligence estimates as well as available technology. This panel will consider several fact patterns, unraveling different interpretations of the principle of proportionality in IHL and its relationship to other branches of international law.
            Speakers:

  • Daniel Cahen, International Committee of the Red Cross
  • Janina Dill, Oxford University
  • Yoram Dinstein, Tel Aviv University
  • Sandesh Sivakumaran, University of Nottingham

                                                Moderator:

  • General Richard Gross, U.S. Joint Chiefs of Staff

10:30 – 10:45 a.m.     Break

10:45 – 12:15 p.m.     Open Working Sessions: ILA Committees/Study Groups (Continued)

  • International Commercial Arbitration
  • Role of International Law in Sustainable Natural Resource Management for Development
  • Role of Soft Law Instruments in International Investment Law (Study Group)
  • International Law and Sea Level Rise

Program Sessions
Autonomous Weaponry and Armed Conflict (from 10:45 – 12:30 p.m.)
Co-sponsored by the ASIL Government Attorneys, International Law and Technology, International Legal Research and UN21 Interest Groups and the ASIL Lieber Society on the Law of Armed Conflict
This panel will address the legal, ethical and political challenges posed by the development of increasingly autonomous weapons systems. Analyzing automated weapons systems through the lenses of international humanitarian law, international human rights law, and international criminal law, it will consider what legal or ethical limits, if any, should be placed on the use of automated weapons systems. It will also consider who should be held accountable for international law violations caused by automated weapons systems.
            Speakers:

  • John Canning, Naval Surface Warfare Center Dahlgren Division
  • Dick Jackson, US Army
  • Naz Modirzadeh, Harvard Law School-Brookings Project on Law and Security, Harvard Law School

            Moderator:

  • Markus Wagner, University of Miami School of Law

The Emergence of New Funding Sources of International Development
Co-sponsored by the ASIL Africa, International Economic Law, International Environmental Law and Law in the Pacific Rim Region Interest Groups
This panel will consider the impact of new donors or sources of funding on international development, including private sector actors and emerging donor states. While these sources promise needed new resources for development, their involvement poses challenges for development policy, including donor coordination and consistent approaches to technical assistance, conditionality, sustainable development guidelines, and mechanisms to ensure transparency. Panelists will address these issues and will also consider the potential for cooperation among new sources and traditional donors and the future of international development in light of the increasing and varied sources of funding.
            Speakers:

  • Cecelia Akintomide, African Development Bank
  • Betsy Apple, Open Society Justice Initiative
  • Tai-Heng Cheng, Quinn Emanuel Urquhart & Sullivan, LLP
  • Aluisio Lima-Campos, American University Washington College of Law
  • Nkunde Mwase, International Monetary Fund

            Moderator:

  • Uche Ewelukwa, University of Arkansas School of Law

The Future of International Criminal Law
Co-sponsored by the ASIL Government Attorneys, Human Rights, International Legal Research, TJ ROL and UN21 Interest Groups and the ASIL Lieber Society on the Law of Armed Conflict
This panel will discuss the future of international criminal law in light of the winding down of the ad hoc tribunals and the mounting challenges faced by the International Criminal Court (ICC) as it becomes fully operational. The conversation will consider perceptions about the ICC's lack of effectiveness; challenges of state compliance with the Rome Statute, court orders, and Security Council referral resolutions; the impending inclusion of the crime of aggression; the potential role of the Court in ongoing conflicts, such as Syria; and the attitude of the three permanent members of the Council who are not parties to the Rome Statute and other states with the power to affect the work of the Court.
Speakers:

  • Hans-Peter Kaul, International Criminal Court
  • Jens Meierhenrich, London School of Economics
  • Milena Sterio, Cleveland State University
  • Jane Stromseth, Office of Global Criminal Justice, U.S. State Department
  • Dire Tladi, University of Pretoria and Institute for Security Studies

                                                Moderator:

  • David Kaye, University of California-Irvine

Effectiveness of International Adjudication: Assessing Functions and Performance
Co-sponsored by the ASIL Africa, Dispute Resolution, International Courts and Tribunals and TJ ROL Interest Groups
This roundtable, loosely built around the goals-based approach, will focus on the effectiveness of international courts and tribunals broadly defined. The roundtable participants will address a series of questions on the functions of international courts, their perceived successes and failures, possible explanations of their record of achievement, externalities generated by courts, trends in judicial effectiveness, necessary structural reforms, and directions for future research.
            Speakers:

  • Sivan Shlomo Agon, New York University  Law School
  • Joan Donoghue, International Court of Justice
  • Victor Peskin, School of Politics and Global Study, Arizona State University
  • Geir Ulfstein, University of Oslo

                                                Moderator:

  • Yuval Shany, Hebrew University of Jerusalem

12:30 – 2:00 p.m.       Lunch
                                    Buffet lunch available for purchase with registration.

12:30 – 2:15 p.m.       Women in International Law Interest Group (WILIG) Luncheon
                                    Honorees: ICJ Judges Julia Sebutinde, Joan Donoghue, and Xue Hanqin
                                    Tickets for this event must be purchased separately with registration.

12:45 – 2:15 p.m.       Program Sessions
Domestic Human Rights Enforcement After Kiobel
Co-sponsored by the ASIL Africa, Human Rights, International Law in Domestic Courts and TJ ROL Interest Groups
The Supreme Court in Kiobel v. Royal Dutch Petroleum narrowed the range of international human rights claims that may be brought pursuant to the Alien Tort Statute. Nonetheless, various avenues for domestic enforcement of international human rights remain. This panel will consider what is left of federal ATS litigation as well as executive, legislative, and foreign enforcement of human rights after Kiobel.
            Speakers:

  • Curt Bradley, Duke Law School
  • Agnieszka Fryszman, Cohen Milstein, LLP
  • Kristin Linsley Myles, Munger Tolles & Olsen, LLP

            Moderator:

  • Katie Redford, EarthRights International

Peace Forces at War: Implications under International Humanitarian Law
Co-sponsored by the ASIL Africa, Government Attorneys, International Legal Research, International Refugee Law and UN21 Interest Groups and the ASIL Lieber Society on the Law of Armed Conflict
Over the years, the tasks assigned to multinational forces have transcended traditional "peace-keeping" and have taken on more aspects of "peace-making" and "peace enforcement." Multinational forces are no longer limited to ensuring cease-fires or monitoring buffer zones, but are often engaged in both maintaining civil order and eradicating threats to the peace posed by a variety of actors. These changes have raised new questions about the application of international humanitarian law to multinational forces – in particular, when does the law apply, what the modifications to legal responsibility (if any) may follow, and how can states and organizations best ensure that the law will be effective?
            Speakers:

  • Tristan Ferraro, International Committee of the Red Cross
  • Colonel Sergio Filippi, Office, of Military Affairs, Department of Peacekeeping Operations, United Nations
  • Marten Zwaneburg, Ministry of Foreign Affairs, The Netherlands, and Leiden University

            Moderator:

  • Bruce Oswald, Melbourne Law School

The Idea of Effective International Law
Sponsored by the ASIL International Legal Theory Interest Group
This panel addresses the concept of effectiveness in international law, this year's conference theme.  Determining the effectiveness of international law requires considering moral, prudential and empirical questions. When does international law produce reasons for decision for States and other international actors? Can international law alter the preferences of States and other international actors, or does it appear effective only where there is a coincidence of interests between the law and those using it? What are the metrics by which one measures the effectiveness of international law, and how is international law doing on these metrics?  Does effectiveness mean different things in different bodies of international law?  This panel will explore these questions in an effort to clarify what it means when we speak of the effectiveness of international law.
            Speakers:

  • Jean d'Aspremont, University of Manchester and University of Amsterdam
  • Rachael Kent, WilmerHale
  • Timothy Meyer, University of Georgia School of Law
  • Liam Murphy, New York University Law School

Moderator:

  • Vijay Padmanabhan, Vanderbilt University Law School

12:45 – 2:15 p.m.       ASIL Government Attorneys Interest Group Business Meeting

2:30 – 4:00 p.m.         ASIL Annual General Meeting

Open Working Sessions: ILA Committees/Study Groups

  • The Conduct of Hostilities under International Humanitarian Law (Study Group)

Program Sessions
Can International Norms Protect Us from Natural Disasters?
Co-sponsored by the ASIL International Environmental Law and International Refugee Law Interest Groups
There is an increasing awareness that natural disasters can increase the risk of human rights violations, environmental harm and economic disruptions. In response, international law is consolidating and expanding international norms relating to the management and regulation of natural disasters and their aftermath. These norms are found in traditional international law instruments, as well as in many non-binding declarations, frameworks, guides, and codes. Yet even with this emerging framework, coordination problems and bottlenecks still plague major relief operations. This panel will consider the prospects for supplementary law-making in this area—beginning with the International Law Commission's project to develop "Draft Articles on the Protection of Persons in the Event of Disasters"—and will examine what international law can do to better protect us from natural disasters.
            Speakers:

  • Kirsten Bookmiller, Millersville University
  • Elizabeth Ferris, Brookings Institution
  • Michael Gerrard, Columbia Law School
  • Ingrid Nifosi-Sutton, American University Washington College of Law

Moderator:

  • David Fisher, International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies

Possible Paradigmatic Changes in the Settlement of International Investment
Co-sponsored by the ASIL Africa, Dispute Resolution, Government Attorneys, International Courts and Tribunals and International Economic Law Interest Groups
Investor-state arbitral tribunals have played a critical role in the development of investment law, through detailed interpretation and application of investment treaties in the context of specific disputes. Recent developments, however, have raised questions concerning the scope of the interpretive power of investor-state tribunals. This panel will identify some of those developments and assess how they are changing the interpretation and application of investment treaties. What impact are they having on the power of arbitral tribunals or the content of decisions reached by such tribunals? Are these developments progressive or regressive?
            Speakers:

  • Mark Clodfelter, Foley Hoag LLP
  • Friedrich Rosenfeld, Hanefeld Rechtsanwalte
  • Jeremy Sharpe, U.S. Department of State
  • Anne van Aaken, University of St. Gallen

Moderator:

  • Hi-Taek Shin, Seoul National University School of Law

Is Forced Feeding in Response to Hunger Strikes a Violation of the Prohibition of Torture and Cruel, Inhuman or Degrading Treatment?
Co-sponsored by the ASIL Human Rights and International Refugee Law Interest Groups and the ASIL Lieber Society on the Law of Armed Conflict
Democratic states have long struggled with the challenges posed by politically motivated offenders choosing to hunger strike in order to ameliorate, challenge, or defy the conditions of their incarceration or for other reasons. This panel examines the human rights challenges posed by the resort to hunger strike by politically motivated prisoners, including the balancing of rights, the protection of the right to life, the right to be free from torture and cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment, and the challenge of honoring a prisoner's autonomy in the context of a state's obligations to protect all those within its effective control.
            Speakers:

  • Baher Azmy, Center for Constitutional Rights
  • Hans Hogrefe, Physicians for Human Rights
  • William K. Lietzau, PAE
  • Walter Ruiz
  • Rachel VanLandingham, Stetson University College of Law
  • Pnina Sharvit Baruch, Institute for National Security Studies

Moderator:

  • Sir Nigel Rodley, University of Essex

4:15 – 5:45 p.m.         Charles N. Brower Lecture on International Dispute Resolution: The Transnational Protection of Private Rights: Issues, Challenges and Possible Solutions

Lecturer: Sundaresh Menon, Chief Justice of Singapore

Open Working Sessions: ILA Committees/Study Groups (Continued)

  • The Conduct of Hostilities under International Humanitarian Law (Study Group)

Program Sessions
Law Enforcement Across Fields: Comparing Human Rights and Trade
Co-sponsored by the ASIL Africa, Government Attorneys, Human Rights and International Economic Law Interest Groups
Enforcement is a central challenge in many fields of global law. This panel examines the dynamics of global law enforcement across the fields of human rights and trade with the goal of deriving general insights into what works and what fails when it comes to the enforcement of global law.  Are differences in enforcement regimes (and in their success) due to inherent differences in the two fields of international law (and, if so, what are those essential differences)? Or are the differences simply products of differing institutional environments?  Are there lessons to be learned about successes in one area of law for the other? And are there ways in which the two bodies of law could (and should) be tied more closely together to strengthen the effectiveness of either one or both?
            Speakers:

  • Marco Bronckers, Leiden University,VVGB Advocaten/Avocats
  • James A. Goldston, Open Society Justice Initiative
  • Jenny Martinez, Stanford Law School
  • Chantal Thomas, Cornell Law School

            Moderator

  • Noah Weisbord, Florida International University

The Making of International Environmental Law: A Conversation With Two Pioneers
Sponsored by the ASIL International Environmental Law Interest Group
Co-sponsored by the ASIL Africa and International Legal Research Interest Groups
Over 40 years ago modern International Environmental Law (IEL) burst on the scene at the 1972 U.N. Conference on Human Development.  Its development was rapid and it has been one of the most fecund normative areas of all international law.  But what about those early days when its future was less certain?  How did those "present at the creation" of IEL deploy the intellectual acumen necessary to permanently entrench the subject on the international agenda?  How is it that those early days had such bold visions for nature's rights, planetary trusts, international environmental courts, a world habeas ecologicus, and so on?  And, what has happened to these important ideas?  This year, the ASIL International Environmental Law Interest Group invites you to join Nicholas Robinson and Edith Brown Weiss, for first hand accounts from two individuals who were there at the beginning and instrumental in launching IEL on its way. The session will be lead by young aspiring international environmental lawyers of the interest group who will quiz Professors Robinson and Brown Weiss about where IEL has been and where it is headed.
            Discussants:

  • Edith Brown Weiss, Georgetown University Law Center
  • Nicholas Robinson, Pace Law School

Questioners:

  • Olivia Radics, Environmental Law Institute
  • Nick Bryner, IUCN World Commission on Environmental Law
  • Kiran Sahdev, Georgetown University Law Center
  • Carina Roselli, Environmental Law Institute

Designing Technology for Human Rights
Sponsored by the ASIL International Law and Technology Interest Group
Drawing on this year's theme of the effectiveness of international law, this session will consider the role of technology in promoting compliance with international human rights law. Technology plays an ever increasing role in a range of human rights activities—regulating freedom of expression, privacy, and security, and enabling a range of other important human rights. Technology, however, is not simply a neutral medium for promoting particular ends. The design of the technology itself reflects important choices about values and even offers the opportunity for increasing state compliance with international law. Important questions remain, however, about the extent to which international law can be embedded in software code. This session will bring together experts from fields as diverse as humanitarian law, human rights fact-finding, national security, and Internet governance to consider the promise, and limits, of using technology to advance international human rights.
Speakers:

  • Jay Aronson, Carnegie Mellon University
  • Laura K. Donohue, Georgetown University Law Center
  • Nathan Freitas, The Guardian Project
  • Dan Saxon, Leiden University College

Moderator:

  • Molly Land, University of Connecticut School of Law

4:15 – 5:45 p.m.         ASIL Disaster Law Interest Group Business Meeting

6:00 – 8:00 p.m.         Reception

6:00 – 8:00 p.m.         L Alumni Reception
Open to current and former employees of the U.S. Department of State Office of the Legal Adviser.

FRIDAY, APRIL 11, 2014

7:00 – 8:15 a.m.         ASIL Interest Group Meetings

  • Private International Law Interest Group
  • International Economic Law Interest Group

8:00 – 10:30 a.m.       ASIL Executive Council Meeting
                                    Invitation only.

9:00 – 10:30 a.m.       Second Meeting of the International Law Association's Full Council
                                    Invitation only.

Program Sessions
Everybody Come Together Over Me: Systemic Integration and Vienna Convention Art 31(3)(c)
Co-sponsored by the ASIL Africa, Cultural Heritage and the Arts, Human Rights and International Economic Law Interest Groups
Article 31(3)(c) of the Vienna Convention provides that all relevant rules of international law must be considered in the interpretation of a treaty. Some tribunals have viewed this provision as a means of ensuring the effectiveness of international legal norms under conditions of fragmentation. Other tribunals, however, have taken a very narrow view of the relevance of outside norms to the interpretation of a specialized treaty regime. This panel will consider the role of Article 31(3)(c) in integrating different domains of international economic law and international investment law with general public international law, human rights law, and international environmental law.
Speakers:

  • James Gathii, Loyola Law School, Chicago
  • Jurgen Kurtz, Melbourne University Faculty of Law
  • •Helene Ruiz-Fabri, Sorbonne Law School (University Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne)
  • Jacob Werksman, European Commission

            Moderators:

  • Barry Appleton, Appleton & Associates International Lawyers
  • Robert Howse, New York University Faculty of Law

International Trade Law and International Investment Law: Complexity and Coherence
Co-sponsored by the ASIL Africa, Government Attorneys, International Economic Law and International Legal Research Interest Groups
International trade law and international investment law are largely contained in separate but overlapping legal regimes, but both share the general objectives of providing security and predictability to economic agents and increasing world prosperity by reducing barriers to international flows of goods, services, and investment. This panel will consider whether the international trade and investment law dichotomy appears increasingly anachronistic, or whether each regime is maturing according to complementary principles. Is there a need for greater coherence? 
Speakers:

  • Mélida Hodgson, Foley Hoag LLP
  • Juan Millan, Office of the U.S. Trade Representative
  • Joost Pauwelyn, Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies
  • Debra Steger, University of Ottawa

            Moderator:

  • Andrew Mitchell, Melbourne Law School

Women's Economic Rights, International Law and the Financial Crisis
Co-sponsored by the ASIL Africa, Government Attorneys, Human Rights and International Economic Law, International Legal Research and Women in International Law Interest Groups
Giving effect to the economic rights of women is increasingly viewed as an essential means of advancing equality and fair treatment standards, as well as a means to achieve broader collective development goals. This roundtable will discuss the rapidly expanding role of international law in giving effect to the economic rights of women in national courts. It will also consider the contribution of national courts in ensuring domestic enforcement of international obligations and in developing women's economic rights under international law, and the enforcement consequences of these rights arising from national judicial responses.
Speakers:

  • Justice Sujata Manohar, former member of Supreme Court of India
  • Eric Schwartz, Hubert H. Humphrey School of Public Affairs, University of Minnesota

Moderator:

  • Patricia O'Brien, Permanent Representation of Ireland to the United Nations Office and other International Organizations

Judges, Diplomats, and Peacebuilders: Evaluating International Dispute Resolution as a System
Sponsored by the ASIL Dispute Resolution Interest Group
Co-sponsored by the ASIL Africa, Government Attorneys and International Courts and Tribunals Interest Groups
The UN Charter envisioned that the promotion of peace among nations could be achieved, in part, through the pacific settlement of international disputes as provided for in Article 33. Revisiting that vision, this panel will evaluate international dispute resolution as a system by considering the interactions between different methods, institutions and actors. For example, what types of disputes might be best addressed through the use of both judicial and diplomatic methods? Are particular methods more effective at resolving disputes involving non-state parties? What is the appropriate relationship among the many institutions, such as the UN Security Council, the International Court of Justice, and the UN Peacebuilding Commission, that share the common aim of promoting international peace and security? This panel will engage the audience in a thoughtful discussion and debate about these and other questions as it examines the evolving purpose and function of international dispute resolution in today's world.
Speakers:

  • Steven Hill, Office of Legal Affairs, North Atlantic Treaty Organization
  • Won Kidane, University of Seattle Law School
  • Stephen Schwebel, International Court of Justice and Permanent Court of Arbitration
  • Jolynn Shoemaker, Center for Strategic and International Studies

Moderator:

  • Anna Spain, University of Colorado Law School

On Socializing States: A Conversation with Ryan Goodman and Derek Jinks on Their Certificate of Merit Winning Book
The Society has awarded its 2014 Certificate of Merit for a Preeminent Contribution to Creative Scholarship to Ryan Goodman and Derek Jinks for Socializing States: Promoting Human Rights Through International Law (Oxford Univ. Press 2013). Goodman and Jinks offer a groundbreaking theory of acculturation that illuminates how social processes can promote human rights and, more generally, can influence norms. "Acculturation" refers to "the general process by which actors adopt the beliefs and behavioral patterns of the surrounding culture." The authors distinguish acculturation from two other mechanisms of social influence: "material inducement," or the offering of rewards for conformity or punishments for nonconformity with a state's or institution's demands, and "persuasion," whereby actors internalize new norms through a process of social learning and "redefine their interests and identities accordingly." Goodman and Jinks offer a sophisticated account that both defends the relevance of acculturation and acknowledges its weaknesses in some areas. In this panel, the authors will present their book's  main arguments and contributions. They will then engage with human rights scholars and practitioners in order to explore the implications of Goodman and Jinks's theory of acculturation. A significant amount of time will be reserved for questions and dialogue with the audience.
Speakers:

  • Ryan Goodman, New York University School of Law
  • Derek Jinks, University of Texas School of Law

Moderator:

  • Jacob Katz Cogan, University of Cincinnati College of Law

Discussants:

  • Monica Hakimi, University of Michigan Law School
  • Siobhan McInerney-Lankford, The World Bank

Emerging Trends and Challenges in International Legal Education and Scholarship
Sponsored by the International Law Students Association
International lawyers spring from many culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds, which helps lend the field of international law its dynamism.  Varying systems of international education endow young legal professionals with differing skills and approaches to international law, and produce equally diverse legal scholarship.  This panel seeks to explore some of the methodologies and challenges not only to teaching international law in various jurisdictions, but also to explore the challenges related to producing both quality international law professionals and legal scholarship in a world that communicates in different languages and cultures.  How do scholars address the challenges associated with differing systems of legal education?  Further, the panelists will address how legal scholars can produce scholarship that will have meaningful impact with the aim of enriching the dialogue and cooperation between international law scholars.
Speakers:

  • André Nollkaemper, Faculty of Law at the University of Amsterdam
  • Alberto Cerda Silva

Moderator:

  • Kaitlin M. Ball, President, International Law Students Association

9:00 – 10:30 a.m.       ASIL International Law in Domestic Courts Interest Group Business Meeting

                                    ASIL Lieber Society on Law of Armed Conflict Business Meeting

10:30 – 10:45 a.m.     Break

10:45 – 12:15 p.m.     ILA Closing Plenary

Fast Pitch: Scholarship Speed Mentoring Session
Co-sponsored by the ASIL Standing Committee on Membership and the AJIL Board of Editors
Leading scholars, including members of the AJIL Board of Editors, will be available for individual "speed-mentoring" sessions.  Prospective authors will be able to "pitch" their article ideas or the scholarly challenges that they face to senior scholars for reactions or suggestions for improvement.  These sessions will be on a relatively short time fuse to enable mentors, organized by specializations within the field, to respond to as many inquiries as possible.

                                    Program Sessions
"Law of Warcraft": New Approaches to Generating Respect for the Law
Co-sponsored by the ASIL Government Attorneys and UN21 Interest Groups and the ASIL Lieber Society on the Law of Armed Conflict
States party to the Geneva Conventions are obligated to disseminate international humanitarian law.  Yet existing efforts have often proven to be ineffective in promoting compliance during armed conflict. In an effort to improve dissemination, innovative methods have recently been developed using technological, visual and social media. This panel will discuss some of the new and creative dissemination methods that are currently being developed and used by actors working in prevention, such as virtual reality tools, revised military training, and law clinics.
Speakers:

  • Vincent Bernard, International Committee of the Red Cross Forum for Integration and Promotion of the Law
  • Laurie Blank, Emory University Law School
  • Brad Gutierrez, American Red Cross
  • David Graham, U.S. Army Judge Advocate General's Legal Center and School

Moderator:

  • Elizabeth Stubbins Bates, SOAS, University of London

 

The Effectiveness of the United Nations Human Rights Protection Machinery
Co-sponsored by the ASIL Africa, Human Rights, International Refugee Law, TJ ROL and UN21Interest Groups
This is an important moment in the life of the UN human rights protection machinery. We are marking the twentieth anniversary of the establishment of the post of High Commissioner for Human Rights; the Human Rights Council has commenced its second-round country reviews under the Universal Periodic Review procedure; and we have reached the end of the first phase of the General Assembly's consultations on the strengthening of the treaty body system. This panel will take stock of the operation of the machinery, paying particular attention to its effectiveness for the protection of human rights.
Speakers:

  • Felice Gaer, Jacob Blaustein Institute
  • Beth Simmons, Harvard University
  • Michael O'Flaherty, Irish Centre for Human Rights
  • Ted Piccone, Brookings Institution

            Moderator:

  • Kathyrn Sikkink, Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University

Water: Challenges for International Law and Policy
Co-sponsored by the ASIL Africa, Government Attorneys, International Environmental Law, International Legal Research and International Refugee Law Interest Groups
International cooperation for the sustainable use and management of water will be one of the great challenges of this century. It is also a possible source of instability that could give rise to humanitarian crises and conflict. The pressing issues include water security, competition over water as a shared natural resource, affordable access to safe drinking water (and sanitation) as a human right, the push to privatize of water resources to drive efficiency,and drought management and related climate change impacts.. This panel will examine these contemporary challenges for the sustainable use of the world's freshwater resources, and the effectiveness of international law to meet those challenges.
Speakers:

  • Stephen McCaffrey, University of the Pacific McGeorge School of Law
  • Laurence Boisson de Chazournes, University of Geneva
  • Gabriel Eckstein, Texas A&M University School of Law

Moderator:

  • Joe Dellapenna, Villanova University School of Law

Punishment and Sentencing in International Criminal Law
Sponsored by the ASIL International Criminal Law Interest Group
International criminal law (ICL) has sought to establish effective mechanisms to hold accountable perpetrators of atrocity crimes and grave breaches of international humanitarian law. ICL sentencing, however, remains under-examined doctrinally, conceptually, and empirically. This panel will address various aspects of ICL sentencing, including an empirical assessment of the sentencing jurisprudence, the relevance and viability of the domestic experience with punishment, and the advancement of new theories and doctrinal frameworks sui generis to international criminal justice.
Speakers:

  • Mark Drumbl, Washington & Lee University School of Law
  • Shahram Dana, The John Marshall Law School
  • Kai Ambos, Georg-August Universität Göttingen

ASIL Interest Group Meetings

  • Human Rights Interest Group
  • Pacific Rim Interest Group

12:30 – 2:15 p.m.       Lunch
                                    Buffet lunch available for purchase with registration.

12:30 – 2:15 p.m.       Hudson Medal Luncheon: A Conversation with Hudson Medal Winner Alain Pellet
                                    Sponsored by Foley Hoag LLP
                                    Speaker: Alain Pellet, University Paris Ouest
                                    Moderator: Peter Tomka, International Court of Justice
                                    Tickets for this event must be purchased separately with registration.

12:45 – 2:15 p.m.       Program Sessions
The Effectiveness of Trade to Govern "Clean Energy" Strategies
Co-sponsored by the ASIL International Economic Law and International Environmental Law Interest Groups
As the international economic order becomes more and more intertwined with concerns about climate change and increasing energy demand, the WTO finds itself at the center of global governance issues emerging in these arenas. This panel will offer diverse perspectives on the role of the international trade regime in governing clean energy strategies and in shaping views on climate change policy and energy issues. In this context, this panel will consider the ramifications of having a multiplicity of legal frameworks for dealing with these overlapping areas, and whether the WTO could serve as a unifying governing structure for the intersection of environmental sustainability, energy and trade.
Speakers:

  • Ricardo Melendez-Ortiz, International Center for Trade and Sustainable Development
  • Gabrielle Marceau, World Trade Organization
  • Aaron Cosbey, International Institute for Sustainable Development
  • Susan Esserman, Steptoe & Johnson LLP

Moderator:

  • Antonia Eliason, University of Mississippi

New Voices in International Law: Making International Criminal Law More Effective
Co-sponsored by the ASIL Africa, International Legal Research, New Professionals and TJ ROL Interest Groups and the ASIL Lieber Society on the Law of Armed Conflict
From the Nuremberg trials to the International Criminal Court, international criminal law has been the subject of scrutiny and criticism regarding its goals and its methods. Proponents of international criminal law point to trials as having a deterrent effect on future atrocities and acknowledging the suffering of victims, while opponents of institutions such as the ICC challenge the perceived politicization of international justice. In this panel, New Voices scholars will present research papers focusing on making international criminal law more effective from multiple perspectives. Panelists will present on: how the jurisprudence of international criminal tribunals considers the impact of mass violence on human behavior and how these approaches can further the work of international criminal justice; the ICC's legitimacy during first operational decade, with a focus on prosecutorial discretion and practice; and the controversial relationship between the United Nations Security Council and the ICC, addressing questions of its ability to meaningfully contribute to the effectiveness of the ICC.
Speakers:

  • Saira Mohamed, University of California-Berkeley School of Law
  • Maria Varaki, Hebrew University/University of Copenhagen
  • Adejoke Babington-Ashaye, World Bank Administrative Tribunal

            Moderator:

  • Gabrielle Kirk McDonald, International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia and Iran-US Claims Tribunal (retired)

Continuities of Violence: What Role for Transitional Justice and the Rule of Law?
Sponsored by the ASIL Transitional Justice and Rule of Law Interest Group.
To what extent can and should transitional justice contribute to the non-repetition of violations?  This panel examines how the design of transitional justice processes and their connection (or lack thereof) to rule-of-law initiatives impacts efforts to prevent, ameliorate or overlook the continuity of human rights violations, crime and violence post-conflict or repression.
Speakers:

  • Colette Rausch, U.S. Institute of Peace
  • Katya Salazar, Due Process of Law Foundation
  • Nahla Valji, UN Women
  • Julie Werbel, USAID

Moderator:

  • Lorna McGregor, University of Essex

Investment Chapters in Trade Agreements: IP rights as protected investments
Sponsored by the ASIL Intellectual Property Interest Group and the ILA Committee on International Trade Law
Investment chapters of trade and investment agreements have attracted renewed attention due to current disputes involving intellectual property rights affecting public health interests. This panel will examine issues that may arise from treating IP rights as protected investments in trade and investment agreements. Should foreign corporations be entitled to demand host country taxpayer compensation by bringing governments before trade and investment arbitration tribunals to challenge domestic court decisions on patents? May government standards regarding intellectual property rights constitute regulatory takings entailing compensation to the intellectual property owner?

Moderator:

  • Frederick M. Abbott, Florida State University College of Law
Speakers:

  • James Love, Knowledge Ecology International
  • William New, Intellectual Property Watch
  • Jerome H. Reichman, Duke University School of Law
  • Susan K. Sell, Elliott School of International Affairs, George Washington University

2:30 – 4:00 p.m.         ASIL-ICCA Task Force Briefing on Issue Conflicts in International Arbitration
There has been an increasing number of proposals to disqualify arbitrators in international arbitration disputes on the ground of bias arising from views expressed in prior decisions and scholarship. ASIL and ICCA have created a joint task force to explore the question of so-called "issue conflict" bias with the aim of developing some form of guidance for the international arbitration community. The Task Force will be holding meetings at the ASIL Annual Meeting and the ICCA Annual Conference to discuss preliminary observations and to receive comments and questions from the ASIL and ICCA audiences.

ABILA Member Meetings (closed)

Program Sessions
Aggression and the Use of Force in International Law
Co-sponsored by the ASIL Africa, Government Attorneys, International Refugee Law and UN21 Interest Groups and the ASIL Lieber Society on the Law of Armed Conflict
This panel will debate the motion "International law permits the provision of arms and other assistance to a rebel movement fighting against an abusive regime." This will be followed by an audience vote and a Q & A session. The ILA Committee on the Use of Force's Final Report 2013 will form the background to the debate.
Speakers:

  • Sean Murphy, George Washington University
  • Claus Kress, University of Koln
  • Harold Hongju Koh, Yale Law School
  • Christine Chinkin, London School of Economics

Moderator:

  • Noam Lubell, University of Essex

Can International Law Keep Up with the Internet?
Co-sponsored by the ASIL International Law and Technology and International Legal Research Interest Groups
This panel will discuss aspects of WTO law that need to be developed to keep pace with the Internet economy and to foster it as an acknowledged source of growth and innovation. It will critically assess the status quo of current Internet regulation, including regulation related to cross-border information and electronic financial flows, data storage and access, and the integrity of commercial data held in the "cloud" or in off-shore storage. From there, the panelists will assess proposed reforms to truly address the digital trade challenge.
Speakers:

  • Usman Ahmed, eBay, Inc.
  • Hamid Mamdouh, World Trade Organization
  • Henry Gao, Singapore Management University

            Moderator:

  • Gary Horlick, Law Offices of Gary N. Horlick, Georgetown Law Center and University of Barcelona

Intelligence Materials and the Courts
Co-sponsored by the ASIL Government Attorneys Interest Group
This panel explores the use of intelligence material as evidence, and how criminal and civil courts approach the issue of secret and classified evidence.  The panel will examine state secrets and public interest immunity, closed material procedures, confidentiality rings and closed material procedures in a wide range of contexts from terrorist trials to whistleblowers.
            Speakers:

  • Martin Chamberlain QC, Brick Court Chambers
  • Kim Prost, United Nations
  • Charlie Savage, The New York Times
  • Kenneth Wainstein, Cadwalader, Wickersham & Taft LLP

Moderator:

  • David Cole, Georgetown University Law Center

The Dispute Settlement System of the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea: An Assessment after 20 Years
Co-sponsored by the ASIL Cultural Heritage and the Arts, Dispute Resolution, International Courts and Tribunals and International Environmental Law Interest Groups
This panel will take stock of 20 years of practice under the dispute settlement system of the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea (UNCLOS), a system that is equipped with the most complex and intricate dispute settlement system of any international legal regime. This panel will consider whether the UNCLOS dispute settlement system is fulfilling its objectives. How did 20 years of adjudication under UNCLOS shape and clarify this complex dispute settlement system? How has it been utilized, by whom, and with what results?
Speakers:

  • Coalter Lathrop, Sovereign Geographic
  • Joanna Mossop, Victoria University at Wellington
  • Natalie Klein, Macquarie University
  • Yoshifumi Tanaka, University of Copenhagen

Moderator:

  • Cesare Romano, Loyola Law School Los Angeles

           
New Voices in International Law: Empirical Perspectives on International Law
Co-sponsored by the ASIL Cultural Heritage and the Arts, International Legal Research and New Professionals Interest Group
Why does the United States sign bilateral investment treaties? What is the effect of law of armed conflict training on military officers' compliance with international law?  What drives the reception of international law into domestic legal systems? Whose suffering really matters to international advocacy NGOs?  Using empirical methods, these "New Voices" provide insight into these and other timely questions of international law.
Speakers:

  • Andrew Bell, Duke University
  • Adam Chilton, University of Chicago
  • Anna Schrimpf, Princeton University
  • Pierre-Hugues Verdier, University of Virginia
  • Mila Versteeg, University of Virginia

Moderator:

  • Gregory Shaffer, University of Minnesota Law School

Dworkin's Philosophy of International Law
The late Ronald Dworkin, in his posthumously published first article on the philosophy of international law, argued that international law is not grounded in the consent of states. Instead, he argued, it is grounded in the duty of each state to mitigate the failures and risks that the sovereign state system poses for its own citizens. In applying his approach, he also interpretatively addressed the legality of humanitarian intervention in the absence of a Security Council authorization. This panel seeks to honor Professor Dworkin by critically discussing and assessing his account of international law, both with regard to its foundations and its implications for the interpretation and progressive development of international law.
Speakers:

  • Jean Cohen, Columbia University
  • Liam Murphy, New York University School of Law
  • Scott Shapiro, Yale Law School

Moderator:

  • Mattias Kumm, New York University School of Law and WZB Social Science Research Center Berlin

ASIL Interest Group Business Meetings

  • ASIL Midwest Interest Group
  • Cultural Heritage and the Arts Interest Group

4:15 – 5:45 p.m.         Plenary Discussion
                                    A Conversation with International Court of Justice Judges Joan Donoghue, Julia Sebutinde, and Xue Hanqin
                                    Moderator: Abiodun Williams, Hague Institute of Global Justice

6:00 – 8:00 p.m.         Receptions (including Hague Alumni Reception and ASIL Patron Reception)

6:00 – 7:30 p.m.         ASIL Interest Group Business Meetings

  • International Refugee Law Interest Group
  • Teaching of International Law Interest Group

8:00 – 10:00 p.m.       Gala Dinner
                                    Speaker: Danilo Turk, former President of Slovenia
                                    Honorees:
                                       Hudson Medal: Alain Pellet, University Paris – Ouest
                                       Butcher Medal: Cherif Bassiouni, DePaul University School of Law
                                       Honorary Member: Fatou Bensouda, International Criminal Court

Tickets must be purchased separately for this event.

10:00 p.m. – 12:00 am           ILSA Dessert and Dance Party

SATURDAY, APRIL 12, 2014

7:00 – 8:30 a.m.         ASIL Interest Group Co-Chairs Breakfast

9:00 – 10:30 a.m.       Program Sessions
Combating Tax Avoidance and Evasion
Co-sponsored by the ASIL Cultural Heritage and the Arts and International Economic Law Interest Groups
In the wake of recent tax evasion scandals, finance ministers and tax administrators have focused their collective and transnational efforts on preventing high net worth individuals from evading their local tax burdens by investing offshore. This panel will explore the nature of such efforts, as well as the coordination problems facing international tax policy-makers. This panel will also consider how efforts to address offshore tax evasion fit within the broader international tax architecture, and how developments in addressing tax evasion through offshore accounts are changing the landscape of international tax law more generally.
            Speakers:

  • Eduardo Baistrocchi, London School of Economics
  • Itai Grinberg, Georgetown University
  • Joe Guttentag, Office of Tax Policy, U.S. Treasury Department (retired)
  • Ruth Mason, University of Virginia

Moderator:

  • Raymond J. Wiacek, Jones Day

The Effectiveness of International Law in "Greening" the Economy
Co-sponsored by the ASIL Africa, International Economic Law and International Environmental Law Interest Groups
Growth and environmental responsibility are often portrayed as irreconcilable goals.  Today, however, with concerns of climate change alongside acutely felt need for job growth, governments and companies are seeking out ways to reconcile the tension between the two through green growth.  The challenges to green growth differ across developed and developing countries. This panel will consider the effectiveness of international law—including trade rules, international environmental law, international intellectual property rule—in facilitating and managing opportunities for green growth.  How can international law more effectively facilitate government and private efforts to promote environmentally responsible economic growth?
Speakers:

  • Rebecca Bratspies, City University of New York School of Law
  • Dan Esty, Yale University
  • Markus Gehring, University of Cambridge
  • Kamal Hossain, Dr. Kamal Hossain & Associates

Moderator:

  • Elizabeth Dowdeswell, Council of Canadian Academies

Challenges of Arbitrators in International Investment Disputes: Standards and Outcomes
Sponsored by the ASIL International Courts and Tribunals Interest Group
Co-sponsored by the ASIL International Economic Law Interest Group
The selection of international arbitrators is a fundamental part of the international arbitration process and should provide comfort and trust to users. However, the standards for arbitrators' independence and impartiality are often unclear and translate into difficult disqualification decisions. Do these threat the legitimacy and effectiveness of international adjudication?  The panelists will discuss the independence standards necessary under different international arbitration systems and assess how and if they work. Panelists will also address the impact of tactical challenges and discuss whether we are moving towards common challenge standards.
            Speakers:

  • Judith Levine, Permanent Court of Arbitration
  • Meg Kinnear, ICSID
  • Jan Paulsson, University of Miami School of Law

Moderator:

  • Chiara Giorgetti, University of Richmond

Sexual Violence in Armed Conflict
Co-sponsored by the ASIL Africa, International Refugee Law, TJ ROL, UN21 and Women in International Law Interest Groups and the ASIL Lieber Society on the Law of Armed Conflict
This panel will identify and discuss key aspects related to sexual violence in conflict, including: the gender dimension (how male victims and female perpetrators are often overlooked); how women are portrayed in the jurisprudence of international criminal tribunals and whether certain gendered stereotypes inform the framing of women's roles in wartime; how girls/boys are viewed as children or women/men; the role of non-state actors; the paucity of accountability at all levels; the responsibilities of states; and multilateral initiatives within and without the UN to address the multifaceted problem of sexual violence.
Speakers:

  • Chris Dolan, Centre for Refugee Law, Makerere University
  • Kimberly Theidon, Harvard University
  • Tonderai Chikuhwa, Office of the Special Representative of the Secretary General on Sexual Violence in Conflict
  • Olga Jurasz, Open University

            Moderator:

  • Dawn Sedman, Oxford Brookes University

State Law Litigation of International Norms
Co-sponsored by the ASIL Human Rights and International Law in Domestic Courts Interest Groups
Scholars and practitioners interested in international litigation in U.S. courts typically focus on federal courts applying federal law. But state laws also may be vehicles for litigating transnational issues, and recent decisions like Morrison and Kiobel, which narrowed the extraterritorial reach of federal law, provide new opportunities for state law to fill the gap. This panel will explore the role of state-law litigation in areas such as human rights, antitrust, and securities, and will address some of the federalism and separation of powers issues raised by such litigation.
            Speakers:

  • Zachary Clopton, University of Chicago Law School
  • Beth Stephens, Rutgers University Law School
  • Cassandra Burke Robertson, Case Western University Law School
  • Anthony Colangelo, Southern Methodist University Dedman School of Law

Moderator:

  • Simona Grossi, Loyola Law School, Los Angeles

10:45 – 12:00 p.m.     Closing Plenary: Syria: Testing the Effectiveness of International Law
The Syrian conflict raises a range of complex challenges for international law. The watching world is acutely aware of deliberate infrastructure destruction, civilian targeting, and massive refugee flows. This panel will consider the range of options open to regional and international actors to address humanitarian suffering and breaches of international law. Can states intervene to address a humanitarian crisis even in the face of a veto by a permanent member of the Security Council? If so, what legal limits apply to such unilateral uses of force? What other options are legally available to address the crisis—such as economic sanctions, arming insurgent groups, or recognizing an emerging coalition government? And what role might the International Criminal Court or other individual accountability mechanisms play in addressing the crisis?     Speakers:

  • Vera Gowlland-Debbas, Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies
  • Michael Ignatieff, Harvard Kennedy School
  • Awn Al-Khasawneh, former Prime Minister, Kingdom of Jordan; former judge, International Court of Justice
  • Ken Roth, Human Rights Watch

Moderator:

  • Donald Francis Donovan, Debevoise & Plimpton LLP

Full Conference Registration

(includes access to all program sessions, ASIL Interest Group meetings and social events, ILA Committee open sessions, receptions, and access to exhibits; Luncheons are extra, please see below)
  ASIL/ILA Member Rate Non-Member Rate
Early Bird (On or before February 7, 2014) $405 $565
Standard (February 8 through March 31, 2014) $480 $650
On-Site (April 1 through 12, 2014) $565 $730
One-Day Registration
Early Bird (On or before January 31, 2014) $300 $380
Standard (February 1 through March 31, 2014) $350 $430
On-Site (April 1 through 12, 2014) $400 $480
ADDITIONAL REGISTRATION TYPES
IO/NGO/GOV Registration*    
Early Bird (On or before February 7, 2014) $155 $195
Standard (February 8 through March 31, 2014) $255 $300
On-Site (April 1 through 12, 2014) $400 $450
Speaker Registration $235 $310
Student Registration* $100 $125
*To qualify for reduced rates, attendees are required to provide a valid proof of identification to registration staff at time of check-in.
All prices are in U.S. Dollars (USD)

Add-on Membership Rates

ABILA Membership $70
ABILA Student Membership Free
ASIL Regular Membership $170
ASIL IO/NGO/GOV Membership $170
ASIL New Professional Membership $110
ASIL Retired Membership $115
ASIL Student Membership $40

Additional Meals and Events

Lunch Buffet Options
Daily Lunch Buffet (M-F) $175
Monday Lunch Buffet $35
Tuesday Lunch Buffet $35
Wednesday Lunch Buffet $35
Thursday Lunch Buffet $35
Friday Lunch Buffet $35
 
Additional Events**
WILIG Luncheon (April 10) $75
Hudson Luncheon (April 11) $75
Gala Dinner (April 11) $150
**Tickets for these events must be purchased on or before Monday, March 24, 2014. Tickets will not be available for purchase onsite.

FAQs

REGISTRATION

What is included in my registration?
Fees include attendance to all program sessions; open ILA committee meetings;  ASIL interest group meetings and socials; and evening receptions; as well as access to exhibits. Meals are not provided with your registration fee.  Additional fees are required for the daily luncheon buffet, ticketed luncheon events, and gala dinner. Please review the program for a detailed schedule.

Are hotel charges included in registration fees?
No, hotel charges are not included in the registration fee. Attendees must book their own hotel arrangements separately.  ASIL and the ILA have secured a block of rooms at the J.W. Marriott Hotel, located at 1331 Pennsylvania Ave., across from the conference site.  The guaranteed room rate of $315 is available for rooms booked before the cut-off date of March 25, 2014.  To make room reservations, click on the accommodations tab on the meeting website.

Are meals included in registration costs?
No, meals are not included in registration costs. A daily luncheon buffet is available for purchase at $35/day or $175 for the week.  Tickets must also be purchased separately for the WILIG Luncheon, April 10, the Hudson Medal Luncheon, April 11, and the Gala Dinner, April 11.  These can be purchased during registration or afterward by contacting services@asil.org, however they must be purchased in advance of the meeting, on or before March 24, 2014. We do not anticipate that additional meal tickets will be available for purchase on-site at the meeting.

What is the cancellation policy?
Cancellations received on or before January 31, 2014 will be refunded 100% of your registration fee, less a $25 administrative fee to cover the cost of processing. Cancellations received between February 1 and March 31, 2014 will be refunded 50% of your registration fee, less a $25 administrative fee. No refunds will be available for cancellations made after March 31, 2014. All requests for cancellations must be made in writing to ASIL Services at services@asil.org.

I received a notice for discounted/complimentary registration. How do I register?
For those who receive a promotional code to receive a discounted registration online, please follow the instructions on your notification. If you registered before you received your discount notice, go to the registration desk to modify/refund your registration as necessary. Individuals must be able to provide ASIL registration staff a copy of the promotional notice.

Is my meeting registration tax deductible?
If the purpose of attending the ASIL Annual Meeting is to help you maintain or improve skills relating to employment or business, a portion of your conference expenses may be tax deductible according to IRS Internal Revenue Code (IRC) Reg. 1.162-5. The eligible deduction for this amount is generally limited. Please consult your tax adviser. You cannot deduct the cost of meals. No solicitation of any kind is allowed at the meeting. By registering to attend, you acknowledge this policy and agree that you will not advertise, represent, or distribute literature for products or services to our exhibitors, attendees or staff. Any attendee that violates this policy will forfeit their registration credentials.

Who qualifies for the Government, Non-governmental and International Organization Rate?
To qualify for the Government/NGO/IO  rate, you must be a.) a full-time employee of a U.S. or foreign government agency (federal, state, local or tribal) (government-supported universities or colleges, government contractors, and government consultants do not qualify);  b.) a full-time employee of a U.S. or foreign non-profit organization recognized by the United Nations; or c.) a full-time employee of an organization designated by the President of the United States through Executive Order to qualify for the privileges, exemptions, and immunities provided in the International Organizations Immunities Act.

Do members of the media need to register?
Yes! Complimentary press registrations are available to those who meet ASIL's media accreditation guidelines To request a complimentary press pass, please contact Sheila Ward, ASIL Director of Communications and Member Relations at sward@asil.org or (+1) 202.939.6018.

What are the on-site registration hours?
Answer forthcoming.

Where can I pick up my badge?
You will receive your badge upon check-in at the meeting. Your badge will be created using the name and affiliation information submitted in your registration. If you would like to change the information on your badge, you may do so on-site at the meeting registration desk.


CONTINUING LEGAL EDUCATION (CLE)

Is CLE credit available for meeting sessions?
Yes, a number of the substantive panels at the ASIL-ILA Joint Meeting will be accredited for CLE. Sessions that are approved for CLE credit will be designated as such in the final program. ASIL will obtain accreditation for all of the CLE sessions from Florida, Georgia, Ohio, Pennsylvania, and Virginia. New York attorneys can gain automatic approval for CLE credits from the Joint meeting through the Approved Jurisdictions policy. Attorneys from states recognizing out-of-state CLE credits in compliance with MCLE standards can obtain reciprocity for credits earned at the Joint Meeting.

What is the format of the courses?
Each course is facilitated by a moderator responsible for keeping speakers on time. Courses are 90 minutes, with 45-60 minutes allocated for presentation and 30-45 minutes at the end for Questions & Answers.'

How do I get CLE documentation?
ASIL uses a "Scan in/Scan out" tracking system for reporting CLE requirements. Every session accredited for CLE will have volunteers stationed at the entrance and exits. Individuals wishing to obtain CLE for attending that session MUST take their ASIL-ILA Joint Meeting badge to the volunteer and have the barcode on the badge scanned. Only individuals who scan in AND out of a session will be awarded CLE credit. During the conference, if you realize you forgot to scan in or out of a session, you may stop by the ASIL CLE table with a colleague who can verify your attendance and have your badge scanned.

Can ASIL still provide me with a Certificate of Attendance if I forgot to scan in and out?
No. State CLE reporting regulation prohibit ASIL from changing an attendance record after the event has ended, regardless of whether or not you can provide witnesses to your attendance.

Can I receive partial credit?
Credit shall be awarded only for attendance at an entire session. No credit shall be awarded for attending a portion of a session.

What should I do if I believe my Certificate of Attendance shows an incorrect CLE credit or contains a typo?
Contact the ASIL via e-mail at cle@asil.org with the following:
1.         Your contact information (name, phone, e-mail, and address)
2.         The session title
3.         What you believe to be incorrect (my name is misspelled, etc.)

Providing ASIL with this information will allow us to respond back to you quickly. Please remember that ASIL may not change any scan in or scan out times after the Joint Meeting has ended.

How do I get my CLE certificate of attendance form?
Following the Joint Meeting, ASIL will process all of the attendee records that contain scan in and scan out times for CLE sessions. ASIL will email every individual with a complete CLE record and ask for certain information (state(s) licensed, attorney id numbers, etc.). Individuals who respond to that email will receive their CLE certificate of attendance.

Does my state require me to take continuing legal education courses?
In the United States, the vast majority of states require lawyers to take mandatory continuing legal education (MCLE) courses in order to practice law. Find out about your state's MCLE requirements on the American Bar Association website http://www.americanbar.org/cle/mandatory_cle.html.

Where can I find information on other ASIL CLE Institutes?
Browse ASIL's events calendar for listings of CLE opportunities at http://www.asil.org/event-list.
 
How can I get the course materials?
All course written materials are provided on compact discs (CDs) to attendees upon registration check-in.


TRANSPORTATION/GENERAL

Will Internet/wifi access be available at the Ronald Reagan Building during the ASIL-ILA joint meeting?
Yes, Internet/wifi access will be available at the Ronald Reagan Building. More specifics regarding Internet access during the conference are forthcoming.

In addition to Internet at the conference venue, all guest and meeting rooms at the conference hotel have wireless and wired Internet access. The lobby and public areas have complimentary wireless.

What is the dress code for the ASIL-ILA joint meeting?
Business attire is recommended for all conference sessions, the exhibit hall and receptions.

What is the weather in Washington, DC during April?
The average daytime temperature is 55 degrees Fahrenheit (13 C) with evening lows of 45 degrees (7 C). Precipitation is minimal.

Is the hotel metro accessible? 
The J.W. Marriott Hotel and Ronald Reagan International Trade Center are  metro accessible via the Metro Center subway station (Red, blue, & orange lines) metro station 2 blocks away. 

Which airports should I fly into/out of for the conference? 
The closest airports to Washington, D.C. are:
Ronald Reagan Washington National Airport (DCA) – 5 miles from hotel
Washington Dulles International Airport (IAD) – 27 miles from hotel
Baltimore-Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport (BWI) – 30 miles from hotel

What is the best method to get from the airport/train station to the conference hotel?
It depends on the airport you use to come to Washington, DC. 

Ronald Reagan Washington National Airport (DCA): 
There is an elevated Metrorail station connected to the airport. Metrorail fare cards may be purchased at machines located at all entrances to the Airport Metrorail station. Take the Blue Line train in the direction of Largo Town Center and exit at the Metro Center metro station. To learn about the Washington DC Metro System, go to www.wmata.com

Washington Dulles International Airport (IAD): 
Travel from the airport to the city is available via Washington Flyer Coach Service. The shuttle will take you non-stop to Metro's West Falls Church Station. From there you can connect via Metro to the Metro Center metro station, two blocks from the J.W. Marriott Hotel. The Washington Flyer Coach Service website, http://www.washfly.com/coach.html provides more information on their services. 

Baltimore-Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport (BWI): 
The airport is located right outside of Baltimore, MD. The best way to get to the hotel is to take a Marc Train to Union Station (1 mile from the hotel). From Union Station, you may take a taxi or use Metro (Red Line), exit at the Metro Center metro station, two blocks from the J.W. Marriott Hotel. Visit http://mta.maryland.gov/marc-train for more information about Marc Trains. 
Taxis and rental cars are also available from all airports. 

Train Station: 
Trains enter into Washington, DC via Union Station. Arriving from Union Station (1.5 miles from the hotel), proceed to the metro station and take the red line train towards Shady Grove. Exit at Metro Center metro station. Taxis are also available at Union Station.

Is there parking at the hotel? What is the cost of parking? (TP) 
There is limited parking available at the hotel. Valet parking is $49.56 daily, no oversized vehicles. There is no self-parking at this hotel.

*All rates are quoted in USD.

What is the estimated cost of ground transportation from the airport to the hotel? 

Ronald Reagan Washington National Airport (DCA):
Taxi - $20.00 one way
Shared Ride Van Service $14.00 one way (www.supershuttle.com)

Washington Dulles International Airport (IAD):
Taxi - $60 one way
Shared Ride Van Service $29.00 one way (www.supershuttle.com)

Baltimore-Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport (BWI): 
Taxi - $90 one way
Shared Ride Van Service $37.00 one way (www.supershuttle.com)

 

SIGHTSEEING

What tourist attractions are available near the conference?

The ILA-ASIL Joint Meeting will take place in the heart of Washington, DC., just steps to the National Mall and the city's many museums, monuments, and other attractions.  A map of the downtown area and Mall is available at http://www.marriott.com/hotels/maps/travel/wasjw-jw-marriott-washington-dc/.

Information about visiting the Smithsonian Museums is available at http://www.si.edu/.

Information about visiting the National Mall, Parks, and monuments is available at http://www.nps.gov/nacc/index.htm.

For those staying at the J.W. Marriott, the hotel concierge may be able to advise you about tourist attractions; please call 202-393-2000 and ask to be connected to concierge.

Other information about tourist attractions in Washington, DC is available at http://washington.org/

Will there be any organized excursions for ILA and ASIL attendees?

ASIL and ILA will organize a couple of excursions, available to attendees for an additional fee.  Information about these excursions and how to register will be posted to the meeting site.

 

ADDITIONAL QUESTIONS
Please email ASIL's Service Center, at services@asil.org or (202) 939-6001.

Hotel Accommodations

Block rooms at the Marriott are filling up, book now!


Alternate 2014 conference hotels

  1. Holiday Inn, 1501 Rhode Island Avenue, NW Washington DC 20005
  2. Embassy Suites Washington DC, 1250 22nd Street NW, Washington, DC, 20037
  3. Hilton Garden Inn Washington DC/Bethesda, 7301 Waverly Street, Bethesda, MD 20814