ASIL Cables

By: Rachel E. VanLandingham | April 01, 2016 |

The moderator, Alka Pradhan, Guantanamo Bay Military Commissions, U.S. Department of Defense, began by noting that a poll released yesterday reflected that approximately two-thirds of Americans support the use of torture. She then showed a video clip of CIA Director John Brennan answering a question regarding whether or not “enhanced interrogation techniques” (EITs) were ever effective, that is, whether they have led to actionable intelligence. Brennan answered that yes, our experts have stated that various detainees who received EITs did provide valuable information later, but whether or...

By: Ryan Harrington | March 31, 2016 |
The session began with Yale Law Professor Oona Hathaway introducing the speakers: Karl Chang, U.S. Department of Defense, Office of the General Counsel; Juliet Bartlett, Ministry of Defence, United Kingdom; Anna Dolidze, Ministry of Defence, Georgia; Jelena Pejic, International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC); and Professor David Glazier, Loyola Law School Los Angeles.   The panel discussed the newly issued Law of War Manual out of the General Counsel’s Office of the U.S. Department of Defense.  This session focused primarily on three elements:   (1) whether the Manual represents...
By: Ryan Harrington | March 31, 2016 |
Participants in this panel discussed the role of international law in the context of sea migration, focusing on the Mediterranean in particular. Chiara Cardoletti-Carroll from the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees moderated.   Speakers gave a brief overview, discussing a protracted problem of displacement that continues unabated. Dr. Ralph Wilde from the University College London Faculty of Laws was unable to attend but provided recorded remarks. He focused on people moving to avoid human rights abuses. International law, he said, allows states to control their borders,...
By: Rachel E. VanLandingham | March 31, 2016 |

Kathleen A. Doty, University of Georgia School of Law, moderated this terrific panel. Jonathan E. Davis, Office of the Legal Adviser, U.S. Department of State, kicked things off by asking what we mean by cyber deterrence, and who are we deterring?

While nuclear deterrence is obviously designed to deter nuclear-capable states from conducting nuclear strikes, the activity a cyber deterrence strategy seeks to discourage ranges from cyber crime to cyber attacks. Additionally, such disconcerting conduct emanates from a variety of actors who need to be deterred, including non-state actors...

By: Kristina Alayan | March 31, 2016 |

Andrew Park is the International Program Director of the Williams Institute at UCLA Law. He moderated this roundtable panel, which explored international trends for the LGBTI community.  The panelists were made up of Melanie Bejzyk, University of Oxford; Professor Fanny Gómez-Lugo, Inter-American Commission on Human Rights and Georgetown University Law Center, and Professor Mark Wojcik, John Marshall Law School.   

After Obergefell, the United States joined twenty-two other countries in recognizing same sex marriage.  More than sixty countries provide protections against...

By: Ryan Harrington | March 31, 2016 |

Moderated by Professor David Koplow of the Georgetown University Law Center, the roundtable on the Iran Nuclear Deal explored the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (JCPOA) agreed to by the P5, Germany, the EU, and Iran in July 2014.

Koplow first introduced the speakers: Professor Asli Bâli of University of California, Los Angeles School of Law; Newell Highsmith, Office of the Legal Adviser, U.S. Department of State; and Dave Jonas, formerly of the of the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board. He gave each of them a few moments to make introductory remarks before proceeding to a...

By: Kristina Alayan | March 29, 2016 |

Welcome to ASIL Cables 2016! As many of you know, ASIL Cables provides online daily reporting for the annual meeting of the American Society of International Law. Gabriela Femenia and I are delighted to carry on the work of Gary Shaw and previous editors who have made this meeting more accessible to attendees, as well as to practitioners, scholars, and students of international law around the world.

As in years past, we will be working with the ASIL team to provide you with content as it becomes available. We will feature summaries of panels, updates on ASIL interest groups, as...

By: Gary J. Shaw | May 02, 2015 |

The ASIL Annual Meeting is once again behind us, but the 2015 Meeting proved to not disappoint. Over the course of 4 days, more than 1000 individuals from 53 countries participated in countless panel discussions, roundtables, lectures, interest group meetings and luncheons. Judge Kenneth Keith of the International Court of Justice gave his thoughts on the 400 year old legacy of Grotius; Michael Reisman of Yale Law School delivered remarks on the evolution of minimum standards in customary international law; and Department of Defense General Counsel Stephen Preston...

By: Beth Van Schaack | April 16, 2015 |

The impending activation of the Kampala amendments to the Statute of the International Criminal Court on the crime of aggression was the subject of a session at this year’s Annual Meeting.  Chaired by Professor Michael J. Matheson of George Washington University Law School, the panel featured presentations by Sarah Sewall, Under-Secretary for Civilian Security, Democracy, and Human Rights, U.S. Department of State; Christine Hansen of the Danish Ministry of Foreign Affairs; Mort Halperin of the Open Society Foundations; and Ambassador Kurt Volkner of the McCain Institute...

By: Rebecca Hamilton | April 16, 2015 |

On April 10, Aaron Fellmeth, Arizona State University College of Law, moderated a well-attended interdisciplinary round-table entitled “Overloading Human Rights Law.”

Fellmeth framed up the topic for the participants, asking whether human rights is already overloaded, and whether additional issues that get posited – from animal rights to internet access--threaten its overload in the future.

James Nickel, University of Miami, began the conversation by tackling the term “overload.”  Drawing on various metaphors, he argued...

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