ASIL Cables

By: Maggie Gardner | April 03, 2016 |
Tafadzwa Pasipanodya, Foley Hoag LLP, adeptly moderated a discussion on Africa’s “blue economy.” Co-sponsored by the International Economic Law and International Environmental Law Interest Groups, the panel considered how Africa can achieve the sustainable and socially equitable use of its ocean resources, and how international law can help ensure that the benefits of those resources accrue to African nations.   Vincent Nmehielle, African Union Commission, described the early stages of the African Union’s efforts to develop an integrated maritime strategy. Despite the promise of the ...
By: Laura Livingston | April 03, 2016 |

Donald Francis Donovan of Debevoise & Plimpton’s International Disputes Group moderated the panel, which addressed various approaches to implementing reparations for states’ internationally wrongful actions under international law. Panelists included Judge Margarette May Macaulay, Inter-American Commission on Human Rights (IACHR); Andrés Jana, Bofill Mir & Alvarez Jana Abogados; Makane Moïse Mbengue, University of Geneva Law School; and Judge Heikki Kanninen, General Court of the European Union.

After overviewing the IACHR’s work, Judge Macaulay highlighted the IACHR’s...

By: Kirsteen Shields | April 02, 2016 |

Professor Tara Melish, SUNY Buffalo Law School, introduced the human rights cities movement as giving local definition and embodiment to human rights. Examples of human rights cities since 1997 include Rosario in Argentina, and cities in South Korea, Ghana, Austria, Canada, and the US - including Washington D.C. She argues that the concept of human rights cities give exposure to ‘human rights framing’, based on proactive and participatory governance. 

Dr. Emily Murase, San Francisco Department on the Status of Women, explained that some ‘human rights’ cities were born out of civil...

By: Kirsteen Shields | April 02, 2016 |

Dr Margot Salomon, LSE, chaired and introduced the panel, highlighting that the application of standards of justice to the topic of foreign debt is overdue. Issues of sovereign debt, austerity and aspects of economic reform have plagued countries for decades.  This panel considered what change could look like.

Dr Salomon began by considering what justice requires. She described the situation in Greece whereby the first IMF-Eurozone loan converted private debt into public debt by bailout out European banks and along with austerity Greek debt skyrocketed. The number of people facing...

By: Rachel E. VanLandingham | April 02, 2016 |
Professor Ashley Deeks, University of Virginia School of Law, opened this terrific panel by exploring the assumption that international law has little to do with intelligence governing activities. She highlighted that since the Snowden leaks, treaties such as the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights (ICCPR) as well as customary international law (CIL) norms like sovereignty and territorial integrity do have a role to play regarding State intelligence activities. Additionally, she noted that shifting types of cyber activities involving non-state actors have also increased...
By: Kristina Alayan | April 02, 2016 |

This just in from the ASIL Staff:

Owing to newly scheduled government debates in the Netherlands, Minister van der Steur is unable to give today's closing plenary address.  The Society is pleased to welcome in his place former Dutch Minister of Justice and current President of Board of the Asser Institute Ernst Hirsch Ballin.

By: Maggie Gardner | April 02, 2016 |

This panel explored the concept of transnational legal orders (TLOs) in a variety of practical contexts. Professor Gregory Shaffer, University of California, Irvine School of Law, convened the panel, which was co-sponsored by the Government Attorneys, International Economic Law, and International Legal Theory Interest Groups. Shaffer rooted the TLO framework in Jessup’s conception of transnational law as a broad and inclusive understanding of the international order, as well as Koh’s conception of transnational legal process as multi-tiered and dynamic. The TLO approach, he explained, is...

By: Maggie Gardner | April 02, 2016 |

A panel of new scholars explored what the next generation of international criminal law will look like. Professor Beth Van Schaack, Stanford Law School, convened the panel and moderated the discussion.

Rebecca Hamilton, Columbia Law School, argued for an approach to international criminal law (ICL) that recognizes the state-enabled nature of many international crimes. She critiqued the current bifurcated structure of adjudicating international crime, with one set of laws, processes and courts for adjudicating individuals, and another set for evaluating state responsibility. This...

By: Amy Porges | April 01, 2016 |
Professor Gabrielle Kaufmann-Kohler, introduced as “the most influential investment arbitrator in the world”, explored the reasons and nature of emerging structural changes in the system of investment arbitration in the fourth annual Charles N. Brower Lecture on “Accountability in International Investment Arbitration". She spoke of changes that are already effected or contemplated with inclusion of a permanent investment court in the Canada-EU Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement and the Vietnam-EU FTA, the EU’s proposal for an investment court in the TTIP negotiations, and...
By: Amy Porges | April 01, 2016 |
ASIL was honored to host President Michelle Bachelet Jerda of Chile, who gave the 18th Annual Grotius Lecture at ASIL’s Annual Meeting while present in Washington, DC for the fourth Nuclear Security Summit. ASIL President Lori Damrosch, and Dean Claudio Grossman​, American University Washington College of Law, introduced President Bachelet as a renowned leader who rose from persecution and exile to become a doctor, a minister of health and of national defense, the first woman elected as head of state in Latin America, the first director of UN Women, and again the President of Chile re-...